Assessment of motivational cognitions in diabetes self-care: the motivation thought frequency scales for glucose testing, physical activity and healthy eating

Parham, Sophie C., Kavanagh, David J., Gericke, Christian A., King, Neil, May, Jon and Andrade, Jackie (2016) Assessment of motivational cognitions in diabetes self-care: the motivation thought frequency scales for glucose testing, physical activity and healthy eating. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 24 3: 1-10. doi:10.1007/s12529-016-9607-2


Author Parham, Sophie C.
Kavanagh, David J.
Gericke, Christian A.
King, Neil
May, Jon
Andrade, Jackie
Title Assessment of motivational cognitions in diabetes self-care: the motivation thought frequency scales for glucose testing, physical activity and healthy eating
Journal name International Journal of Behavioral Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1070-5503
1532-7558
Publication date 2016-11-07
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s12529-016-9607-2
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 24
Issue 3
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Springer New York LLC
Language eng
Abstract There is a need for improved measurement of motivation for diabetes self-care. The Elaborated Intrusion Theory of Desire offers a coherent framework for understanding and identifying the cognitive-affective events that constitute the subjective experience of motivation and may therefore inform the development of such an instrument. Recent research has shown the resultant Motivation Thought Frequency scale (MTF) to have a stable factor structure (Intensity, Incentives Imagery, Self-Efficacy Imagery, Availability) when applied to physical activity, excessive snacking or alcohol use in the general population. The current study aimed to confirm the four-factor structure of the MTF for glucose testing, physical activity and healthy eating in people with type 2 diabetes. Associations with self-reports of concurrent diabetic self-care behaviours were also examined.

Confirmatory factor analyses tested the internal structure, and multiple regressions assessed the scale's relationship with concurrent self-care behaviours. The MTF was completed by 340 adults with type 2 diabetes, and 237 from that sample also reported self-care behaviours. Separate MTFs assessed motivation for glucose testing, physical activity and healthy eating. Self-care was assessed using questions from the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities.

The MTF for each goal achieved an acceptable fit on all indices after selected errors within factors were allowed to intercorrelate. Intensity and Self-Efficacy Imagery provided the strongest and most consistent correlations with relevant self-care behaviours.

Results provide preliminary support for the MTF in a diabetes sample. Testing of its sensitivity to change and its predictive utility over time is needed.
Formatted abstract
Purpose: There is a need for improved measurement of motivation for diabetes self-care. The Elaborated Intrusion Theory of Desire offers a coherent framework for understanding and identifying the cognitive-affective events that constitute the subjective experience of motivation and may therefore inform the development of such an instrument. Recent research has shown the resultant Motivation Thought Frequency scale (MTF) to have a stable factor structure (Intensity, Incentives Imagery, Self-Efficacy Imagery, Availability) when applied to physical activity, excessive snacking or alcohol use in the general population. The current study aimed to confirm the four-factor structure of the MTF for glucose testing, physical activity and healthy eating in people with type 2 diabetes. Associations with self-reports of concurrent diabetic self-care behaviours were also examined.

Method: Confirmatory factor analyses tested the internal structure, and multiple regressions assessed the scale’s relationship with concurrent self-care behaviours. The MTF was completed by 340 adults with type 2 diabetes, and 237 from that sample also reported self-care behaviours. Separate MTFs assessed motivation for glucose testing, physical activity and healthy eating. Self-care was assessed using questions from the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities.

Results: The MTF for each goal achieved an acceptable fit on all indices after selected errors within factors were allowed to intercorrelate. Intensity and Self-Efficacy Imagery provided the strongest and most consistent correlations with relevant self-care behaviours.

Conclusion: Results provide preliminary support for the MTF in a diabetes sample. Testing of its sensitivity to change and its predictive utility over time is needed.
Keyword Assessment
Cognition
Diabetes
Imagery
Motivation
Self-management
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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