Changes in duodenal tissue-associated microbiota following hookworm infection and consecutive gluten challenges in humans with coeliac disease

Giacomin, Paul, Zakrzewski, Martha, Jenkins, Timothy P., Su, Xiaopei, Al-Hallaf, Rafid, Croese, John, De Vries, Stefan, Grant, Andrew, Mitreva, Makedonka, Loukas, Alex, Krause, Lutz and Cantacessi, Cinzia (2016) Changes in duodenal tissue-associated microbiota following hookworm infection and consecutive gluten challenges in humans with coeliac disease. Scientific Reports, 6 36797. doi:10.1038/srep36797


Author Giacomin, Paul
Zakrzewski, Martha
Jenkins, Timothy P.
Su, Xiaopei
Al-Hallaf, Rafid
Croese, John
De Vries, Stefan
Grant, Andrew
Mitreva, Makedonka
Loukas, Alex
Krause, Lutz
Cantacessi, Cinzia
Title Changes in duodenal tissue-associated microbiota following hookworm infection and consecutive gluten challenges in humans with coeliac disease
Journal name Scientific Reports   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2045-2322
Publication date 2016-11-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/srep36797
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 6
Start page 36797
Total pages 10
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Language eng
Subject 1000 General
Abstract A reduced diversity of the gastrointestinal commensal microbiota is associated with the development of several inflammatory diseases. Recent reports in humans and animal models have demonstrated the beneficial therapeutic effects of infections by parasitic worms (helminths) in some inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and coeliac disease (CeD). Interestingly, these studies have described how helminths may alter the intestinal microbiota, potentially representing a mechanism by which they regulate inflammation. However, for practical reasons, these reports have primarily analysed the faecal microbiota. In the present investigation, we have assessed, for the first time, the changes in the microbiota at the site of infection by a parasitic helminth (hookworm) and gluten-dependent inflammation in humans with CeD using biopsy tissue from the duodenum. Hookworm infection and gluten exposure were associated with an increased abundance of species within the Bacteroides phylum, as well as increases in the richness and diversity of the tissue-resident microbiota within the intestine, results that are consistent with previous reports using other helminth species in humans and animal models. Hence, this may represent a mechanism by which parasitic helminths may restore intestinal immune homeostasis and exert a therapeutic benefit in CeD, and potentially other inflammatory disorders.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
UQ Diamantina Institute Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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