Women’s views on anxiety in pregnancy and the use of anxiety instruments: a qualitative study

Evans, Kerry, Morrell, C. Jane and Spiby, Helen (2016) Women’s views on anxiety in pregnancy and the use of anxiety instruments: a qualitative study. Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology, 35 1: 1-14. doi:10.1080/02646838.2016.1245413


Author Evans, Kerry
Morrell, C. Jane
Spiby, Helen
Title Women’s views on anxiety in pregnancy and the use of anxiety instruments: a qualitative study
Journal name Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1469-672X
0264-6838
Publication date 2016-11-10
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/02646838.2016.1245413
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 35
Issue 1
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Subject 2735 Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
2743 Reproductive Medicine
3200 Psychology
2729 Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Abstract Objective: To explore women’s experience of anxiety in pregnancy and views on the use of anxiety instruments in antenatal care. Background: Anxiety in pregnancy is associated with adverse birth outcomes, developmental and behavioural problems in infants and postnatal depression. Despite recommendations for routine psychological assessment in pregnancy, the optimal methods to identify anxiety in pregnancy have not been confirmed. Methods: A qualitative study using two focus group discussions was undertaken. Focus group one included women in a community setting and focus group two included women in a hospital clinic setting who had received additional support for anxiety in pregnancy. Participants were women who had given birth within the past nine months and considered themselves to have been anxious during their pregnancy. Results: Three main themes were identified using template analysis: sources of support, administration of anxiety instruments and the use of instruments to prompt discussion. Women stated that anxiety instruments could help them to identify their anxious feelings and prompt a discussion around those feelings. However, they expressed concerns surrounding the administration of anxiety instruments and questioned how useful they would be in helping women access help and support. Conclusions: The introduction of anxiety instruments in antenatal care may present an opportunity to discuss women’s emotional health and anxieties. Providing women with sufficient time to discuss their anxious feelings, identified by such instruments, could facilitate access to additional support.
Formatted abstract
Objective: To explore women’s experience of anxiety in pregnancy and views on the use of anxiety instruments in antenatal care.

Background: Anxiety in pregnancy is associated with adverse birth outcomes, developmental and behavioural problems in infants and postnatal depression. Despite recommendations for routine psychological assessment in pregnancy, the optimal methods to identify anxiety in pregnancy have not been confirmed.

Methods: A qualitative study using two focus group discussions was undertaken. Focus group one included women in a community setting and focus group two included women in a hospital clinic setting who had received additional support for anxiety in pregnancy. Participants were women who had given birth within the past nine months and considered themselves to have been anxious during their pregnancy.

Results: Three main themes were identified using template analysis: sources of support, administration of anxiety instruments and the use of instruments to prompt discussion. Women stated that anxiety instruments could help them to identify their anxious feelings and prompt a discussion around those feelings. However, they expressed concerns surrounding the administration of anxiety instruments and questioned how useful they would be in helping women access help and support.

Conclusions: The introduction of anxiety instruments in antenatal care may present an opportunity to discuss women’s emotional health and anxieties. Providing women with sufficient time to discuss their anxious feelings, identified by such instruments, could facilitate access to additional support.
Keyword Antenatal
Anxiety
Focus group discussion
Identification
Pregnancy
Qualitative
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 22 Nov 2016, 10:47:54 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)