Association between family cancer history and risk of pancreatic cancer

Schulte, Annaka, Pandeya, Nirmala, Fawcett, Jonathan, Fritschi, Lin, Klein, Kerenaftali, Risch, Harvey A., Webb, Penelope M., Whiteman, David C. and Neale, Rachel E. (2016) Association between family cancer history and risk of pancreatic cancer. Cancer Epidemiology, 45 145-150. doi:10.1016/j.canep.2016.10.005


Author Schulte, Annaka
Pandeya, Nirmala
Fawcett, Jonathan
Fritschi, Lin
Klein, Kerenaftali
Risch, Harvey A.
Webb, Penelope M.
Whiteman, David C.
Neale, Rachel E.
Title Association between family cancer history and risk of pancreatic cancer
Journal name Cancer Epidemiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1877-783X
1877-7821
Publication date 2016-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.canep.2016.10.005
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 45
Start page 145
End page 150
Total pages 6
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 2713 Epidemiology
2730 Oncology
1306 Cancer Research
Abstract Purpose Family history of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is an established risk factor for the disease. However, associations of pancreatic cancer with other familial cancers are less clear. We analyzed data from the Queensland Pancreatic Cancer Study (QPCS), an Australian population-based case-control study, to investigate associations between family history of various cancer types and risk of pancreatic cancer. Materials and methods Our study included 591 pancreatic cancer patients and 646 controls, all of whom self-reported the histories of cancer in their first-degree relatives. We used logistic regression to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Based on our results, we conducted a systematic literature review using the Medline (OVID) database to identify articles pertaining to the association between family history of melanoma and risk of pancreatic cancer. A meta-analysis including associations in five published studies, unpublished results from a study co-author and the QPCS results was then performed using the DerSimonian and Laird random-effects model. Results Cases were more likely than controls to report a family history of pancreatic cancer (OR 2.20, 95% CI 1.16–4.19) and melanoma (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.03–2.95), but not of breast, ovarian, respiratory, other gastrointestinal or prostate cancer. Meta-analysis of melanoma family history and pancreatic cancer risk yielded an OR of 1.22 (95% CI 1.00–1.51). Conclusions Our results yield further evidence of increased risk of pancreatic cancer in those with family histories of the disease. We also provide suggestive evidence of an association between family history of melanoma and risk of pancreatic cancer.
Formatted abstract
Purpose: Family history of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is an established risk factor for the disease. However, associations of pancreatic cancer with other familial cancers are less clear. We analyzed data from the Queensland Pancreatic Cancer Study (QPCS), an Australian population-based case-control study, to investigate associations between family history of various cancer types and risk of pancreatic cancer.

Materials and methods: Our study included 591 pancreatic cancer patients and 646 controls, all of whom self-reported the histories of cancer in their first-degree relatives. We used logistic regression to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Based on our results, we conducted a systematic literature review using the Medline (OVID) database to identify articles pertaining to the association between family history of melanoma and risk of pancreatic cancer. A meta-analysis including associations in five published studies, unpublished results from a study co-author and the QPCS results was then performed using the DerSimonian and Laird random-effects model.

Results: Cases were more likely than controls to report a family history of pancreatic cancer (OR 2.20, 95% CI 1.16–4.19) and melanoma (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.03–2.95), but not of breast, ovarian, respiratory, other gastrointestinal or prostate cancer. Meta-analysis of melanoma family history and pancreatic cancer risk yielded an OR of 1.22 (95% CI 1.00–1.51).

Conclusions: Our results yield further evidence of increased risk of pancreatic cancer in those with family histories of the disease. We also provide suggestive evidence of an association between family history of melanoma and risk of pancreatic cancer.
Keyword Case-control studies
Family cancer history
Melanoma
Pancreatic neoplasms
Risk factors
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
 
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