Individual differences in structural and functional connectivity predict speed of emotion discrimination

Marstaller, Lars, Burianova, Hana and Reutens, David C. (2016) Individual differences in structural and functional connectivity predict speed of emotion discrimination. Cortex, 85 65-74. doi:10.1016/j.cortex.2016.10.001

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Author Marstaller, Lars
Burianova, Hana
Reutens, David C.
Title Individual differences in structural and functional connectivity predict speed of emotion discrimination
Journal name Cortex   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1973-8102
0010-9452
Publication date 2016-12-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.cortex.2016.10.001
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 85
Start page 65
End page 74
Total pages 10
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Language eng
Abstract In social interactions, individuals who are slower at differentiating between facial expressions signalling direct and indirect threat might be at a serious disadvantage. However, the neurobiological underpinnings of individual differences in face processing are not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to use multimodal neuroimaging to investigate how the speed of emotion recognition is related to the structural and functional connectivity underlying the differentiation of direct and indirect threat displays. Our results demonstrate that individuals, who are faster at discriminating angry faces, engaged areas of the extended emotional system more strongly than individuals with slower reaction times, showed higher white matter integrity in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), as well as stronger functional connectivity with the right amygdala. In contrast, individuals, who were faster at discriminating fearful faces, engaged visual-attentional regions outside of the face processing network more strongly than individuals with slower reaction times, showed higher white matter integrity in the ILF, as well as reduced functional connectivity with the right amygdala. Our findings suggest that the high survival value of rapid and appropriate responses to threat has defined but separate neurobiological correlates for angry and fearful facial expressions.
Keyword Emotion discrimination
Individual differences
Structural-functional connectivity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID SR120300015
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Science of Learning Centre Publications
Centre for Advanced Imaging Publications
 
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