Integrating new indicators to identify predictors for shaping the public perception on local extreme temperature in China

Ban, Jie, Huang, Lei, Chen, Chen, Guo, Yuming, He, Mike Z. and Li, Tiantian (2016) Integrating new indicators to identify predictors for shaping the public perception on local extreme temperature in China. Science of The Total Environment, 579 529-536. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.11.064


Author Ban, Jie
Huang, Lei
Chen, Chen
Guo, Yuming
He, Mike Z.
Li, Tiantian
Title Integrating new indicators to identify predictors for shaping the public perception on local extreme temperature in China
Journal name Science of The Total Environment   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0048-9697
1879-1026
Publication date 2016-11-16
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.11.064
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 579
Start page 529
End page 536
Total pages 8
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Language eng
Abstract The public's risk perception of local extreme heat or cold plays a critical role in community health and prevention under climate change. However, there is limited evidence on such issues in China where extreme weather is occurring more frequently due to climate change. Here, a total of 2500 residents were selected using a three-step sampling method and investigated by a questionnaire in two representative cities. We investigated risk perception of extreme heat in Beijing and extreme cold in Harbin in 2013, aiming to examine their possible correlations with multiple epidemiological factors. We found that exposure, vulnerability, and adaptive ability were significant predictors in shaping public risk perceptions of local extreme temperature. In particular, a 1 °C increase in daily temperature resulted in an increased odds of perceiving serious extreme heat in Beijing (OR = 1.091; 95% CI: 1.032, 1.153), while a 1 °C increase in daily temperature resulted in a decreased odds of perceiving serious extreme cold in Harbin (OR = 0.965; 95% CI: 0.939, 0.992). Therefore for both extreme heat and cold, frequent local extreme temperature exposure may amplify a stronger communication. Health interventions for extreme temperature should consider exposure, vulnerability, and adaptive ability factors. This will help improve the public's perception of climatic changes and their willingness to balance adaption and mitigation appropriately.
Keyword Public risk perception
Local extreme heat
Local extreme cold
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID T32 ES023770
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 19 Nov 2016, 03:57:45 EST by Yuming Guo on behalf of School of Public Health