An open-label pilot study of oral vitamin C as an opioid-sparing agent in patients with chronic pain secondary to cancer

Pinkerton, E., Good, P., Gibbons, K. and Hardy, J. (2016) An open-label pilot study of oral vitamin C as an opioid-sparing agent in patients with chronic pain secondary to cancer. Supportive Care in Cancer, 25 2: 1-3. doi:10.1007/s00520-016-3472-z


Author Pinkerton, E.
Good, P.
Gibbons, K.
Hardy, J.
Title An open-label pilot study of oral vitamin C as an opioid-sparing agent in patients with chronic pain secondary to cancer
Journal name Supportive Care in Cancer   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1433-7339
0941-4355
Publication date 2016-11-04
Year available 2017
Sub-type Letter to editor, brief commentary or brief communication
DOI 10.1007/s00520-016-3472-z
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 25
Issue 2
Start page 1
End page 3
Total pages 3
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Abstract The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy of oral Vitamin C as an opioid-sparing agent when used in conjunction with opioids and standard adjuvant therapy in the management of chronic cancer pain.
Formatted abstract
Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy of oral Vitamin C as an opioid-sparing agent when used in conjunction with opioids and standard adjuvant therapy in the management of chronic cancer pain.

Methods: An open-label pilot study of patients ≥18 years of age with chronic pain secondary to cancer and/or its treatment and a Brief Pain Inventory average pain score of ≥3/10. In addition to opioid analgesia, patients received 1 g of vitamin C twice daily over 3 days (total daily dose of 2 g). Patients’ usual medications, including breakthrough medications, were continued throughout the study period. The primary endpoint was total daily opioid use during vitamin C administration compared with that immediately prior to study.

Results: Thirty-four patients were enrolled in the study. Seven failed to complete the trial. Across the 17 evaluable patients, the median daily opioid consumption was 360 mg oral morphine equivalents (OME) on the days prior to vitamin C and 390 mg when administered with vitamin C.

Conclusion: This study failed to demonstrate any clinically significant benefit from vitamin C in conjunction with opioids in cancer-related pain and does not provide support for embarking on a larger randomised trial to determine efficacy.
Keyword Cancer
Pain
Vitamin C
Opioids
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes All Mater UQ affiliated

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Letter to editor, brief commentary or brief communication
Collections: Mater Research Institute-UQ (MRI-UQ)
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Created: Sat, 19 Nov 2016, 01:17:07 EST by Julia McCabe on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)