Rapid radiations and the race to redundancy: an investigation of the evolution of Australian elapid snake venoms

Jackson, Timothy N. W., Koludarov, Ivan, Ali, Syed A., Dobson, James, Zdenek, Christina N., Dashevsky, Daniel, Op den Brouw, Bianca, Masci, Paul P., Nouwens, Amanda, Josh, Peter, Goldenberg, Jonathan, Cipriani, Vittoria, Hay, Chris, Hendrikx, Iwan, Dunstan, Nathan, Allen, Luke and Fry, Bryan G. (2016) Rapid radiations and the race to redundancy: an investigation of the evolution of Australian elapid snake venoms. Toxins, 8 11: . doi:10.3390/toxins8110309


Author Jackson, Timothy N. W.
Koludarov, Ivan
Ali, Syed A.
Dobson, James
Zdenek, Christina N.
Dashevsky, Daniel
Op den Brouw, Bianca
Masci, Paul P.
Nouwens, Amanda
Josh, Peter
Goldenberg, Jonathan
Cipriani, Vittoria
Hay, Chris
Hendrikx, Iwan
Dunstan, Nathan
Allen, Luke
Fry, Bryan G.
Title Rapid radiations and the race to redundancy: an investigation of the evolution of Australian elapid snake venoms
Journal name Toxins   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2072-6651
Publication date 2016-10-26
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3390/toxins8110309
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 8
Issue 11
Total pages 24
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publisher M D P I AG
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Australia is the stronghold of the front-fanged venomous snake family Elapidae. The Australasian elapid snake radiation, which includes approximately 100 terrestrial species in Australia, as well as Melanesian species and all the world’s sea snakes, is less than 12 million years old. The incredible phenotypic and ecological diversity of the clade is matched by considerable diversity in venom composition. The clade’s evolutionary youth and dynamic evolution should make it of particular interest to toxinologists, however, the majority of species, which are small, typically inoffensive, and seldom encountered by non-herpetologists, have been almost completely neglected by researchers. The present study investigates the venom composition of 28 species proteomically, revealing several interesting trends in venom composition, and reports, for the first time in elapid snakes, the existence of an ontogenetic shift in the venom composition and activity of brown snakes (Pseudonaja sp.). Trends in venom composition are compared to the snakes’ feeding ecology and the paper concludes with an extended discussion of the selection pressures shaping the evolution of snake venom.
Keyword Venom
Elapid
Coagulation
Proteomics
Evolution
Redundancy
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Fri, 18 Nov 2016, 21:53:40 EST by Mrs Louise Nimwegen on behalf of School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences