Symbiodinium biogeography tracks environmental patterns rather than host genetics in a key Caribbean reef-builder, Orbicella annularis

Kennedy, Emma V., Tonk, Linda, Foster, Nicola L., Chollett, Iliana, Ortiz, Juan-Carlos, Dove, Sophie, Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove, Mumby, Peter J. and Stevens, Peter J. (2016) Symbiodinium biogeography tracks environmental patterns rather than host genetics in a key Caribbean reef-builder, Orbicella annularis. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 283 1842: . doi:10.1098/rspb.2016.1938


Author Kennedy, Emma V.
Tonk, Linda
Foster, Nicola L.
Chollett, Iliana
Ortiz, Juan-Carlos
Dove, Sophie
Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove
Mumby, Peter J.
Stevens, Peter J.
Title Symbiodinium biogeography tracks environmental patterns rather than host genetics in a key Caribbean reef-builder, Orbicella annularis
Formatted title
Symbiodinium biogeography tracks environmental patterns rather than host genetics in a key Caribbean reef-builder, Orbicella annularis
Journal name Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0962-8452
1471-2954
Publication date 2016-11-16
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2016.1938
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 283
Issue 1842
Total pages 10
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher The Royal Society Publishing
Language eng
Subject 1300 Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
2400 Immunology and Microbiology
2300 Environmental Science
1100 Agricultural and Biological Sciences
Abstract The physiological performance of a reef-building coral is a combined outcome of both the coral host and its algal endosymbionts, Symbiodinium. While Orbicella annularis—a dominant reef-building coral in the Wider Caribbean— is known to be a flexible host in terms of the diversity of Symbiodinium types it can associate with, it is uncertain how this diversity varies across the Caribbean, and whether spatial variability in the symbiont community is related to either O. annularis genotype or environment. Here, we target the Symbiodinium-ITS2 gene to characterize and map dominant Symbiodinium hosted by O. annularis at an unprecedented spatial scale. We reveal northwest-southeast partitioning across the Caribbean, both in terms of the dominant symbiont taxa hosted and in assemblage diversity. Multivariate regression analyses incorporating a suite of environmental and genetic factors reveal that observed spatial patterns are predominantly explained by chronic thermal stress (summer temperatures) and are unrelated to host genotype. Furthermore, we were able to associate the presence of specific Symbiodinium types with local environmental drivers (for example, Symbiodinium C7 with areas experiencing cooler summers, B1j with nutrient loading and B17 with turbidity), associations that have not previously been described.
Formatted abstract
The physiological performance of a reef-building coral is a combined outcome of both the coral host and its algal endosymbionts, Symbiodinium. While Orbicella annularis—a dominant reef-building coral in the Wider Caribbean—is known to be a flexible host in terms of the diversity of Symbiodinium types it can associate with, it is uncertain how this diversity varies across the Caribbean, and whether spatial variability in the symbiont community is related to either O. annularis genotype or environment. Here, we target the Symbiodinium-ITS2 gene to characterize and map dominant Symbiodinium hosted by O. annularis at an unprecedented spatial scale. We reveal northwest–southeast partitioning across the Caribbean, both in terms of the dominant symbiont taxa hosted and in assemblage diversity. Multivariate regression analyses incorporating a suite of environmental and genetic factors reveal that observed spatial patterns are predominantly explained by chronic thermal stress (summer temperatures) and are unrelated to host genotype. Furthermore, we were able to associate the presence of specific Symbiodinium types with local environmental drivers (for example, Symbiodinium C7 with areas experiencing cooler summers, B1j with nutrient loading and B17 with turbidity), associations that have not previously been described.
Keyword Symbiont diversity
Zooxanthellae
Environmental drivers
Coral bleaching
Denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis
Internal Transcribed Spacer 2
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID NE/E010393/1
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27807263

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 16 Nov 2016, 17:44:35 EST by Michelle Hall on behalf of Global Change Institute