The effect of close approaches for tagging activities by small research vessels on the behavior of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae)

Williamson, Michael J., Kavanagh, Ailbhe S., Noad, Michael J., Kniest, Eric and Dunlop, Rebecca A. (2016) The effect of close approaches for tagging activities by small research vessels on the behavior of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae). Marine Mammal Science, 32 4: 1234-1253. doi:10.1111/mms.12324


Author Williamson, Michael J.
Kavanagh, Ailbhe S.
Noad, Michael J.
Kniest, Eric
Dunlop, Rebecca A.
Title The effect of close approaches for tagging activities by small research vessels on the behavior of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae)
Formatted title
The effect of close approaches for tagging activities by small research vessels on the behavior of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae)
Journal name Marine Mammal Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1748-7692
0824-0469
Publication date 2016-10-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/mms.12324
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 32
Issue 4
Start page 1234
End page 1253
Total pages 20
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Small research vessels are often used as platforms for tagging activities to collect behavioral data on cetaceans and they have the potential to disturb that group or individual. If this disturbance is ignored, results and conclusions produced by that study could be inaccurate. Here land-based behavioral data of migrating humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) (n = 29) were used to determine the effect of close approaches for tagging by research vessels on their diving, movement and surface behaviors. Groups of whales were tagged, using digital recording tags, by small research vessels, as part of a behavioral response study. In groups that were approached for tagging, temporary changes in movement behaviors during close approaches were found, with subsequent recovery to “pre-approach” levels. In female-calf groups more long-term changes in travel speed were found. Results suggest that, although close approaches for tagging by small vessels may cause behavioral changes in humpback whales, this change may be small and temporary. However, in female-calf groups, the behavioral change may be greater and longer lasting. This study shows that when using small vessels for behavioral research, disturbance, and recovery should be measured to ensure integrity of data used for other analyses.
Keyword Anthropogenic disturbance
Behavior
BRAHSS
Cetacean
Humpback whale
Megaptera novaeangliae
Vessel
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 08 Nov 2016, 10:59:53 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)