Parent-related stress of male and female carers of adolescents with intellectual disabilities and carers of children within the general population: a cross-sectional comparison

Patton, Kiri, Ware, Robert S., McPherson, Lyn, Emerson, Eric and Lennox, Nicholas G. (2016) Parent-related stress of male and female carers of adolescents with intellectual disabilities and carers of children within the general population: a cross-sectional comparison. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 31 1: 51-61. doi:10.1111/jar.12292


Author Patton, Kiri
Ware, Robert S.
McPherson, Lyn
Emerson, Eric
Lennox, Nicholas G.
Title Parent-related stress of male and female carers of adolescents with intellectual disabilities and carers of children within the general population: a cross-sectional comparison
Journal name Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1468-3148
1360-2322
Publication date 2016-09-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/jar.12292
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 31
Issue 1
Start page 51
End page 61
Total pages 11
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject 3304 Education
3204 Developmental and Educational Psychology
Abstract Background: Carers of children with intellectual disability show high rates of parent-related stress and are at an increased risk for deleterious physical and mental health. Materials and Methods: This study investigated the relationship between demographic and social characteristics and parenting stress, within two different cross-sectional samples of carers: those who care for an adolescent with an intellectual disability and carers from a population based sample. Participants were 1152 carers from the Household Income and Labour Dynamic in Australia study and 284 carers of adolescents with intellectual disabilities from the Ask study. Results and Conclusions: The results supported previous research suggesting carers of children with intellectual disabilities experience high parent-related stress. The results also support the buffer model of social support, as high social support was related to lower parent-related stress. Self-rated prosperity, financial pressure and relationship status were also related to lower levels of parent-related stress.
Formatted abstract
Background

Carers of children with intellectual disability show high rates of parent-related stress and are at an increased risk for deleterious physical and mental health.

Materials and Methods

This study investigated the relationship between demographic and social characteristics and parenting stress, within two different cross-sectional samples of carers: those who care for an adolescent with an intellectual disability and carers from a population based sample. Participants were 1152 carers from the Household Income and Labour Dynamic in Australia study and 284 carers of adolescents with intellectual disabilities from the Ask study.

Results and Conclusions

The results supported previous research suggesting carers of children with intellectual disabilities experience high parent-related stress. The results also support the buffer model of social support, as high social support was related to lower parent-related stress. Self-rated prosperity, financial pressure and relationship status were also related to lower levels of parent-related stress.
Keyword Adolescents
Intellectual disability
Parent-related stress
Parenting stress
Social support
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID 401647
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Mater Research Institute-UQ (MRI-UQ)
HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 01 Nov 2016, 03:40:23 EST by Lyn Mcpherson on behalf of Qld Ctr Intellectual and Developmental Disability