The evolution of recombination rates in finite populations during ecological speciation

Reeve, James, Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel and Engelstädter, Jan (2016) The evolution of recombination rates in finite populations during ecological speciation. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London - B - Biological Sciences, 283 1841: . doi:10.1098/rspb.2016.1243


Author Reeve, James
Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel
Engelstädter, Jan
Title The evolution of recombination rates in finite populations during ecological speciation
Journal name Proceedings of the Royal Society of London - B - Biological Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1471-2954
0962-8452
Publication date 2016-10-26
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2016.1243
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 283
Issue 1841
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher The Royal Society Publishing
Language eng
Subject 2700 Medicine
2400 Immunology and Microbiology
1300 Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
2300 Environmental Science
1100 Agricultural and Biological Sciences
Abstract Recombination can impede ecological speciation with gene flow by mixing locally adapted genotypes with maladapted migrant genotypes from a divergent population. In such a scenario, suppression of recombination can be selectively favoured. However, in finite populations evolving under the influence of random genetic drift, recombination can also facilitate adaptation by reducing Hill–Robertson interference between loci under selection. In this case, increased recombination rates can be favoured. Although these two major effects on recombination have been studied individually, their joint effect on ecological speciation with gene flow remains unexplored. Using a mathematical model, we investigated the evolution of recombination rates in two finite populations that exchange migrants while adapting to contrasting environments. Our results indicate a two-step dynamic where increased recombination is first favoured (in response to the Hill–Robertson effect), and then disfavoured, as the cost of recombining locally with maladapted migrant genotypes increases over time (the maladaptive gene flow effect). In larger populations, a stronger initial benefit for recombination was observed, whereas high migration rates intensify the long-term cost of recombination. These dynamics may have important implications for our understanding of the conditions that facilitate incipient speciation with gene flow and the evolution of recombination in finite populations.
Keyword Adaptive divergence
Hill–Robertson effect
Maladaptive gene flow
Mathematical model
Random genetic drift
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID DP140103774
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
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Created: Tue, 01 Nov 2016, 00:27:31 EST by Dr Daniel Ortiz-barrientos on behalf of School of Biological Sciences