Resting and injury-induced inflamed periosteum contain multiple macrophage subsets that are located at sites of bone growth and regeneration

Alexander, Kylie Anne, Raggatt, Liza-Jane, Millard, Susan, Batoon, Lena, Wu, Andy Chiu-Ku, Chang, Ming-Kang, Hume, David Arthur and Pettit, Allison Robyn (2016) Resting and injury-induced inflamed periosteum contain multiple macrophage subsets that are located at sites of bone growth and regeneration. Immunology and Cell Biology, 95 1: 7-16. doi:10.1038/icb.2016.74


Author Alexander, Kylie Anne
Raggatt, Liza-Jane
Millard, Susan
Batoon, Lena
Wu, Andy Chiu-Ku
Chang, Ming-Kang
Hume, David Arthur
Pettit, Allison Robyn
Title Resting and injury-induced inflamed periosteum contain multiple macrophage subsets that are located at sites of bone growth and regeneration
Journal name Immunology and Cell Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0818-9641
1440-1711
Publication date 2016-08-24
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/icb.2016.74
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 95
Issue 1
Start page 7
End page 16
Total pages 39
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Better understanding of bone growth and regeneration mechanisms within periosteal tissues will improve understanding of bone physiology and pathology. Macrophage contributions to bone biology and repair have been established but specific investigation of periosteal macrophages has not been undertaken. We used an immunohistochemistry approach to characterise macrophages in growing murine bone and within activated periosteum induced in a mouse model of bone injury. Osteal tissue macrophages (osteomacs) and resident macrophages were distributed throughout resting periosteum. Tissues were collected from 4 week old mice and osteomacs were observed intimately associated with sites of periosteal diaphyseal and metaphyseal bone dynamics associated with normal growth. This included F4/80+Mac-2−/low osteomac association with extended tracks of bone formation (modeling) on diphyseal periosteal surfaces. While this recapitulated endosteal osteomac characteristics, there was subtle variance in the morphology and spatial organization of modelling-associated osteomacs, which likely reflects the greater structural complexity of periosteum. We also demonstrated that osteomacs, resident macrophages and inflammatory macrophages (F4/80+Mac-2hi) were associated with the complex bone dynamics occurring within the periosteum at the metaphyseal corticalization zone. These 3 macrophage subsets were also present within activated native periosteum after bone injury across a 9 day time course that spanned the inflammatory through remodeling bone healing phases. This included osteomac association with foci of endochondral ossification within the activated native periosteum. These observations confirm that osteomacs are key components of both osteal tissues, in spite of salient differences between endosteal and periosteal structure and that multiple macrophage subsets are involved in periosteal bone dynamics.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 24 August 2016. Article in Press

 
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Created: Sat, 29 Oct 2016, 05:20:23 EST by Andy Wu on behalf of Mater Research Institute-UQ