Reproducibility in measuring physical activity in children and adolescents with an acquired brain injury.

Baque, Emmah, Barber, Lee, Sakzewski, Leanne and Boyd, Roslyn N (2016) Reproducibility in measuring physical activity in children and adolescents with an acquired brain injury.. Brain Injury, 30 13-14: 1-7. doi:10.1080/02699052.2016.1201594


Author Baque, Emmah
Barber, Lee
Sakzewski, Leanne
Boyd, Roslyn N
Title Reproducibility in measuring physical activity in children and adolescents with an acquired brain injury.
Journal name Brain Injury   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0269-9052
1362-301X
Publication date 2016-10-24
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/02699052.2016.1201594
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 30
Issue 13-14
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Language eng
Subject 3204 Developmental and Educational Psychology
1201 Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
2728 Clinical Neurology
Abstract Aim: To examine the reproducibility in measurement of physical activity performance using the ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometer in children aged 8–16 years with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI). Methods: Reproducibility of standardized tasks: Thirty-two children with ABI (12 years 1 month, SD = 2 years 4 months; 20 males; Gross Motor Function Classification System I = 17, II = 15) performed the following activities on 2 consecutive days while wearing an accelerometer and a heart rate monitor: quiet sitting, slow walking (SW), moderate walking (MW), fast walking (FW) and rapid stepping on/off a block (STEP). Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated. Performance variability: Fifty-one participants (12 years 1 month, SD = 2 years 5 months; 27 males; GMFCS I = 26, II = 25) wore an accelerometer for 4 days in the community and reliability coefficients were calculated using standardized 12-hour time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Results: Test–re-test reproducibility was excellent for all activities (SW, ICC = 0.90; MW, ICC = 0.83; FW, ICC = 0.91; STEP, ICC = 0.89). Three days of monitoring produced excellent variability estimates of MVPA (R = 0.78). Conclusion: Therapists can confidently use accelerometry as a reproducible measure of physical activity under standardized walking and stepping conditions, as well as in the community for children with ABI.
Formatted abstract
Aim: To examine the reproducibility in measurement of physical activity performance using the ActiGraph® GT3X+ accelerometer in children aged 8–16 years with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI).

Methods: Reproducibility of standardized tasks: Thirty-two children with ABI (12 years 1 month, SD = 2 years 4 months; 20 males; Gross Motor Function Classification System I = 17, II = 15) performed the following activities on 2 consecutive days while wearing an accelerometer and a heart rate monitor: quiet sitting, slow walking (SW), moderate walking (MW), fast walking (FW) and rapid stepping on/off a block (STEP). Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated. Performance variability: Fifty-one participants (12 years 1 month, SD = 2 years 5 months; 27 males; GMFCS I = 26, II = 25) wore an accelerometer for 4 days in the community and reliability coefficients were calculated using standardized 12-hour time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA).

Results: Test–re-test reproducibility was excellent for all activities (SW, ICC = 0.90; MW, ICC = 0.83; FW, ICC = 0.91; STEP, ICC = 0.89). Three days of monitoring produced excellent variability estimates of MVPA (R = 0.78).

Conclusion: Therapists can confidently use accelerometry as a reproducible measure of physical activity under standardized walking and stepping conditions, as well as in the community for children with ABI.
Keyword Physical activity
Children
Adolescents
Acquired brain injury
Accelerometer
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID 1070623
1090828
1105038
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Child Health Research Centre Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 26 Oct 2016, 22:25:38 EST by Ms Leanne Sakzewski on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences