Objectively quantified physical activity and sedentary behavior in predicting visceral adiposity and liver fat

Keating, Shelley E., Parker, Helen M., Pavey, Toby G., Baker, Michael K., Caterson, Ian D., George, Jacob and Johnson, Nathan A. (2016) Objectively quantified physical activity and sedentary behavior in predicting visceral adiposity and liver fat. Journal of Obesity, 2016 2719014: 2719014-2719014. doi:10.1155/2016/2719014


Author Keating, Shelley E.
Parker, Helen M.
Pavey, Toby G.
Baker, Michael K.
Caterson, Ian D.
George, Jacob
Johnson, Nathan A.
Title Objectively quantified physical activity and sedentary behavior in predicting visceral adiposity and liver fat
Journal name Journal of Obesity   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2090-0716
2090-0708
Publication date 2016-08-25
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1155/2016/2719014
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 2016
Issue 2719014
Start page 2719014
End page 2719014
Total pages 10
Place of publication New York, NY United States
Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Language eng
Subject 2712 Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
Abstract Objective. Epidemiologic studies suggest an inverse relationship between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), visceral adipose tissue (VAT), and self-reported physical activity levels. However, subjective measurements can be inaccurate and prone to reporter bias. We investigated whether objectively quantified physical activity levels predicted liver fat and VAT in overweight/obese adults. Methods. Habitual physical activity was measured by triaxial accelerometry for four days (n = 82). Time spent in sedentary behavior (MET < 1.6) and light (MET 1.6 < 3), moderate (MET 3 < 6), and vigorous (MET 6 < 9) physical activity was quantified. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy were used to quantify visceral and liver fat. Bivariate correlations and hierarchical multiple regression analyses were performed. Results. There were no associations between physical activity or sedentary behavior and liver lipid. Sedentary behavior and moderate and vigorous physical activity accounted for just 3% of variance for VAT (p = 0.14) and 0.003% for liver fat (p = 0.96). Higher levels of VAT were associated with time spent in moderate activity (r = 0.294, p = 0.007), but there was no association with sedentary behavior. Known risk factors for obesity-related NAFLD accounted for 62% and 40% of variance in VAT and liver fat, respectively (p < 0.01). Conclusion. Objectively measured levels of habitual physical activity and sedentary behavior did not influence VAT or liver fat.
Formatted abstract
Objective. Epidemiologic studies suggest an inverse relationship between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), visceral adipose tissue (VAT), and self-reported physical activity levels. However, subjective measurements can be inaccurate and prone to reporter bias. We investigated whether objectively quantified physical activity levels predicted liver fat and VAT in overweight/obese adults. Methods. Habitual physical activity was measured by triaxial accelerometry for four days (n = 82). Time spent in sedentary behavior (MET < 1.6) and light (MET 1.6 < 3), moderate (MET 3 < 6), and vigorous (MET 6 < 9) physical activity was quantified. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy were used to quantify visceral and liver fat. Bivariate correlations and hierarchical multiple regression analyses were performed. Results. There were no associations between physical activity or sedentary behavior and liver lipid. Sedentary behavior and moderate and vigorous physical activity accounted for just 3% of variance for VAT (p = 0.14) and 0.003% for liver fat (p = 0.96). Higher levels of VAT were associated with time spent in moderate activity (r = 0.294, p = 0.007), but there was no association with sedentary behavior. Known risk factors for obesity-related NAFLD accounted for 62% and 40% of variance in VAT and liver fat, respectively (p < 0.01). Conclusion. Objectively measured levels of habitual physical activity and sedentary behavior did not influence VAT or liver fat.
Keyword Endocrinology & Metabolism
Endocrinology & Metabolism
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 24 Oct 2016, 06:54:57 EST by Shelley Keating on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences