Reactions to changes in work control: implications for self-determined and non-self-determined individuals

Parker, Stacey L., Jimmieson, Nerina L. and Amiot, Catherine E. (2016) Reactions to changes in work control: implications for self-determined and non-self-determined individuals. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 21 4: 455-467. doi:10.1037/a0040022


Author Parker, Stacey L.
Jimmieson, Nerina L.
Amiot, Catherine E.
Title Reactions to changes in work control: implications for self-determined and non-self-determined individuals
Journal name Journal of Occupational Health Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1939-1307
1076-8998
Publication date 2016-10-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/a0040022
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 21
Issue 4
Start page 455
End page 467
Total pages 13
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Psychological Association
Language eng
Abstract We investigate the extent to which individuals' global motivation (self-determined and non-self-determined types) influences adjustment (anxiety, positive reappraisal) and engagement (intrinsic motivation, task performance) in reaction to changes to the level of work control available during a work simulation. Participants (N = 156) completed 2 trials of an inbox activity under conditions of low or high work control-with the ordering of these levels varied to create an increase, decrease, or no change in work control. In support of the hypotheses, results revealed that for more self-determined individuals, high work control led to the increased use of positive reappraisal. Follow-up moderated mediation analyses revealed that the increases in positive reappraisal observed for self-determined individuals in the conditions in which work control was high by Trial 2 consequently increased their intrinsic motivation toward the task. For more non-self-determined individuals, high work control (as well as changes in work control) led to elevated anxiety. Follow-up moderated mediation analyses revealed that the increases in anxiety observed for non-self-determined individuals in the high-to-high work control condition consequently reduced their task performance. It is concluded that adjustment to a demanding work task depends on a fit between individuals' global motivation and the work control available, which has consequences for engagement with demanding work.
Formatted abstract
We investigate the extent to which individuals' global motivation (self-determined and non-selfdetermined types) influences adjustment (anxiety, positive reappraisal) and engagement (intrinsic motivation, task performance) in reaction to changes to the level of work control available during a work simulation. Participants (N = 156) completed 2 trials of an inbox activity under conditions of low or high work control-with the ordering of these levels varied to create an increase, decrease, or no change in work control. In support of the hypotheses, results revealed that for more self-determined individuals, high work control led to the increased use of positive reappraisal. Follow-up moderated mediation analyses revealed that the increases in positive reappraisal observed for self-determined individuals in the conditions in which work control was high by Trial 2 consequently increased their intrinsic motivation toward the task. For more non-self-determined individuals, high work control (as well as changes in work control) led to elevated anxiety. Follow-up moderated mediation analyses revealed that the increases in anxiety observed for non-self-determined individuals in the high-to-high work control condition consequently reduced their task performance. It is concluded that adjustment to a demanding work task depends on a fit between individuals' global motivation and the work control available, which has consequences for engagement with demanding work.
Keyword Adjustment
Engagement
Person-environment fit
Self-determination
Work control
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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School of Psychology Publications
 
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