Pathways maintaining physical health problems from childhood to young adulthood: the role of stress and mood

Dalton, Elizabeth D., Hammen, Constance L., Brennan, Patricia A. and Najman, Jake M. (2016) Pathways maintaining physical health problems from childhood to young adulthood: the role of stress and mood. Psychology and Health, 31 11: 1255-1271. doi:10.1080/08870446.2016.1204448


Author Dalton, Elizabeth D.
Hammen, Constance L.
Brennan, Patricia A.
Najman, Jake M.
Title Pathways maintaining physical health problems from childhood to young adulthood: the role of stress and mood
Journal name Psychology and Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1476-8321
0887-0446
Publication date 2016-11-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/08870446.2016.1204448
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 31
Issue 11
Start page 1255
End page 1271
Total pages 17
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Abstract Poor physical health in childhood is associated with a variety of negative health-related outcomes in adulthood. Psychosocial pathways contributing to the maintenance of physical health problems from childhood to young adulthood remain largely unexamined, despite evidence that factors such as negative mood and stress impact physical health.

The current study tested the direct and indirect effects of ongoing health, chronic stress, health-related chronic stress, and depressive symptoms at age 20 on the link between health problems in childhood and young adulthood (age 21) in a longitudinal sample (n = 384).

The hypotheses were tested using a multiple mediation path analysis framework; the primary outcome measure was a composite index of health status markers in young adulthood.

The proposed model provided an adequate fit for the data, with significant total indirect effects of the four mediators and significant specific indirect effects of health-related chronic stress and depressive symptoms in maintaining health problems from childhood into young adulthood.

Health problems are maintained from early childhood into young adulthood in part through psychosocial mechanisms. Depressive symptoms and health-related chronic stress have significant, unique effects on the relationship between health problems in early childhood and young adulthood.
Formatted abstract
Objective: Poor physical health in childhood is associated with a variety of negative health-related outcomes in adulthood. Psychosocial pathways contributing to the maintenance of physical health problems from childhood to young adulthood remain largely unexamined, despite evidence that factors such as negative mood and stress impact physical health.

Design: The current study tested the direct and indirect effects of ongoing health, chronic stress, health-related chronic stress, and depressive symptoms at age 20 on the link between health problems in childhood and young adulthood (age 21) in a longitudinal sample (n = 384).

Main Outcome Measures: The hypotheses were tested using a multiple mediation path analysis framework; the primary outcome measure was a composite index of health status markers in young adulthood.

Results: The proposed model provided an adequate fit for the data, with significant total indirect effects of the four mediators and significant specific indirect effects of health-related chronic stress and depressive symptoms in maintaining health problems from childhood into young adulthood.

Conclusions: Health problems are maintained from early childhood into young adulthood in part through psychosocial mechanisms. Depressive symptoms and health-related chronic stress have significant, unique effects on the relationship between health problems in early childhood and young adulthood.
Keyword Childhood
Chronic stress
Depressive symptoms
Physical health
Young adulthood
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID R01 MH052239
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
 
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