Variable mortality from the 1918–1919 influenza pandemic during military training

Shanks, G. Dennis, Burroughs, Steven, Sohn, Joshua D., Waters, Norman C., Smith, Virginia F., Waller, Michael and Brundage, John F. (2016) Variable mortality from the 1918–1919 influenza pandemic during military training. Military Medicine, 181 8: 878-882. doi:10.7205/MILMED-D-15-00124


Author Shanks, G. Dennis
Burroughs, Steven
Sohn, Joshua D.
Waters, Norman C.
Smith, Virginia F.
Waller, Michael
Brundage, John F.
Title Variable mortality from the 1918–1919 influenza pandemic during military training
Journal name Military Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1930-613X
0026-4075
Publication date 2016-08-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.7205/MILMED-D-15-00124
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 181
Issue 8
Start page 878
End page 882
Total pages 5
Place of publication Bethesda, MD, United States
Publisher Association of Military Surgeons of the US
Language eng
Subject 2739 Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
Abstract During the 1918–1919 pandemic, influenza mortality widely varied across populations and locations. Records of U.S. military members in mobilization camps (n = 40), military academies, and officer training schools were examined to document differences in influenza experiences during the fall 1918. During the fall–winter 1918–1919, mortality percentages were higher among soldiers in U.S. Army mobilization camps (0.34–4.3%) than among officer trainees (0–1.0%). Susceptibility to infection and clinical expressions of 1918 pandemic influenza varied largely based on host epidemiological characteristics rather than the inherent virulence of the virus.
Formatted abstract
During the 1918–1919 pandemic, influenza mortality widely varied across populations and locations. Records of U.S. military members in mobilization camps (n = 40), military academies, and officer training schools were examined to document differences in influenza experiences during the fall 1918. During the fall–winter 1918–1919, mortality percentages were higher among soldiers in U.S. Army mobilization camps (0.34–4.3%) than among officer trainees (0–1.0%). Susceptibility to infection and clinical expressions of 1918 pandemic influenza varied largely based on host epidemiological characteristics rather than the inherent virulence of the virus.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
 
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