Sustained, low-intensity exercise achieved by a dynamic feeding system decreases body fat in ponies

de Laat, M. A., Hampson, B. A., Sillence, M. N. and Pollitt, C. C. (2016) Sustained, low-intensity exercise achieved by a dynamic feeding system decreases body fat in ponies. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 30 5: 1732-1738. doi:10.1111/jvim.14577


Author de Laat, M. A.
Hampson, B. A.
Sillence, M. N.
Pollitt, C. C.
Title Sustained, low-intensity exercise achieved by a dynamic feeding system decreases body fat in ponies
Journal name Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1939-1676
0891-6640
Publication date 2016-09-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/jvim.14577
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 30
Issue 5
Start page 1732
End page 1738
Total pages 7
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject 3400 Veterinary
Abstract Obesity in horses is increasing in prevalence and can be associated with insulin insensitivity and laminitis. Current treatment strategies for obesity include dietary restriction and exercise. However, whether exercise alone is effective for decreasing body fat is uncertain.

Our hypothesis was that twice daily use of a dynamic feeding system for 3 months would induce sustained, low-intensity exercise thereby decreasing adiposity and improving insulin sensitivity (SI).

Eight, university-owned, mixed-breed, adult ponies with body condition scores (BCS) ≥5/9 were used.

Two treatments ("feeder on" or "feeder off") were administered for a 3-month period by a randomized, crossover design (n = 4/treatment). An interim equilibration period of 6 weeks at pasture separated the 2 study phases. Measurements of body mass (body weight, BCS, cresty neck score [CrNS], and morphometry), body fat (determined before and after the "feeder on" treatment only), triglycerides, and insulin sensitivity (SI; combined glucose-insulin test) were undertaken before and after treatments.

The dynamic feeding system induced a 3.7-fold increase in the daily distance travelled (n = 6), compared to with a stationary feeder, which significantly decreased mean BCS (6.53 ± 0.94 to 5.38 ± 1.71), CrNS (2.56 ± 1.12 to 1.63 ± 1.06) and body fat (by 4.95%). An improvement in SI did not occur in all ponies.

A dynamic feeding system can be used to induce sustained (daily), low-intensity exercise that promotes weight loss in ponies. However, this exercise may not be sufficient to substantially improve SI.
Formatted abstract
Background: Obesity in horses is increasing in prevalence and can be associated with insulin insensitivity and laminitis. Current treatment strategies for obesity include dietary restriction and exercise. However, whether exercise alone is effective for decreasing body fat is uncertain.

Hypothesis: Our hypothesis was that twice daily use of a dynamic feeding system for 3 months would induce sustained, low-intensity exercise thereby decreasing adiposity and improving insulin sensitivity (SI).

Animals: Eight, university-owned, mixed-breed, adult ponies with body condition scores (BCS) ≥5/9 were used.

Methods: Two treatments (“feeder on” or “feeder off”) were administered for a 3-month period by a randomized, crossover design (n = 4/treatment). An interim equilibration period of 6 weeks at pasture separated the 2 study phases. Measurements of body mass (body weight, BCS, cresty neck score [CrNS], and morphometry), body fat (determined before and after the “feeder on” treatment only), triglycerides, and insulin sensitivity (SI; combined glucose-insulin test) were undertaken before and after treatments.

Results: The dynamic feeding system induced a 3.7-fold increase in the daily distance travelled (n = 6), compared to with a stationary feeder, which significantly decreased mean BCS (6.53 ± 0.94 to 5.38 ± 1.71), CrNS (2.56 ± 1.12 to 1.63 ± 1.06) and body fat (by 4.95%). An improvement in SI did not occur in all ponies.

Conclusions and Clinical Importance: A dynamic feeding system can be used to induce sustained (daily), low-intensity exercise that promotes weight loss in ponies. However, this exercise may not be sufficient to substantially improve SI.
Keyword Equine metabolic syndrome
Horse
Insulin
Obesity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 11 Oct 2016, 11:25:14 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)