Determination of Ancylostoma caninum ova viability using metabolic profiling

Gyawali, P., Beale, D. J., Ahmed, W., Karpe, A. V., Magalhaes, R. J. S., Morrison, P. D. and Palombo, E. A. (2016) Determination of Ancylostoma caninum ova viability using metabolic profiling. Parasitology Research, 115 9: 3485-3492. doi:10.1007/s00436-016-5112-4


Author Gyawali, P.
Beale, D. J.
Ahmed, W.
Karpe, A. V.
Magalhaes, R. J. S.
Morrison, P. D.
Palombo, E. A.
Title Determination of Ancylostoma caninum ova viability using metabolic profiling
Formatted title
Determination of Ancylostoma caninum ova viability using metabolic profiling
Journal name Parasitology Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1432-1955
0932-0113
Publication date 2016-09-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00436-016-5112-4
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 115
Issue 9
Start page 3485
End page 3492
Total pages 8
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Abstract Differentiation between viable and non-viable hookworm ova in environmental samples is necessary in order to implement strategies to mitigate re-infections in endemic regions. In this study, an untargeted metabolic profiling method was developed that utilised gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in order to investigate hookworm ova viability. Ancylostoma caninum was used to investigate the metabolites within viable and non-viable ova. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses of the data resulted in the identification of 53 significant metabolites across all hookworm ova samples. The major compounds observed in viable and non-viable hookworm ova were tetradecanoic acid, commonly known as myristic acid [fold change (FC) = 0.4], and dodecanoic acid, commonly known as lauric acid (FC = 0.388). Additionally, the viable ova had self-protecting metabolites such as prostaglandins, a typical feature absent in non-viable ova. The results of this study demonstrate that metabolic profiling using GC-MS methods can be used to determine the viability of canine hookworm ova. Further studies are needed to assess the applicability of metabolic profiling using GC-MS to detect viable hookworm ova in the mixed (viable and non-viable) populations from environmental samples and identify the metabolites specific to human hookworm species.
Formatted abstract
Differentiation between viable and non-viable hookworm ova in environmental samples is necessary in order to implement strategies to mitigate re-infections in endemic regions. In this study, an untargeted metabolic profiling method was developed that utilised gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in order to investigate hookworm ova viability. Ancylostoma caninum was used to investigate the metabolites within viable and non-viable ova. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses of the data resulted in the identification of 53 significant metabolites across all hookworm ova samples. The major compounds observed in viable and non-viable hookworm ova were tetradecanoic acid, commonly known as myristic acid [fold change (FC) = 0.4], and dodecanoic acid, commonly known as lauric acid (FC = 0.388). Additionally, the viable ova had self-protecting metabolites such as prostaglandins, a typical feature absent in non-viable ova. The results of this study demonstrate that metabolic profiling using GC-MS methods can be used to determine the viability of canine hookworm ova. Further studies are needed to assess the applicability of metabolic profiling using GC-MS to detect viable hookworm ova in the mixed (viable and non-viable) populations from environmental samples and identify the metabolites specific to human hookworm species.
Keyword Health risk
Hookworm ova
Mass spectrometry
Metabolic profile
Viability
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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