Combined effect of education and reproductive history on weight trajectories of young Australian women: a longitudinal study

Holowko, Natalie, Jones, Mark, Koupil, Ilona, Tooth, Leigh and Mishra, Gita (2016) Combined effect of education and reproductive history on weight trajectories of young Australian women: a longitudinal study. Obesity, 24 10: 2224-2231. doi:10.1002/oby.21610


 
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Author Holowko, Natalie
Jones, Mark
Koupil, Ilona
Tooth, Leigh
Mishra, Gita
Title Combined effect of education and reproductive history on weight trajectories of young Australian women: a longitudinal study
Journal name Obesity   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1930-739X
1930-7381
Publication date 2016-10-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/oby.21610
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 24
Issue 10
Start page 2224
End page 2231
Total pages 8
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishingc.
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: To investigate the combined effect of education and reproductive history on weight trajectory.

Methods: The association of education with weight trajectory (1996–2012) in relation to reproductive history was analyzed among 9,336 women (born 1973–1978) from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health using random effects models.

Results: Compared with women with a university degree/higher, lower-educated women were 2 kg heavier at baseline and gained an additional 0.24 kg/year. Giving birth was associated with an increase in weight which was more pronounced among women having their first birth <26 years of age (2.1 kg, 95% CI: 1.5–2.7), compared with 26 to 32 years or >32 years. While younger first-time mothers had a steeper weight trajectory (∼+0.16 kg/year, 95% CI: 0.1–0.3), this was less steep among lower-educated women. High-educated women with a second birth between 26 and 32 years had 0.9 kg decreased weight after this birth, while low-educated women gained 0.9 kg.

Conclusions: While the effect of having children on weight in young adulthood was minimal, women having their first birth <26 years of age had increased risk of weight gain, particularly primiparous women. Educational differences in weight persisted after accounting for reproductive history, suggesting a need to explore alternative mechanisms through which social differences in weight are generated.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
 
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