Geography of conservation spending, biodiversity, and culture

McClanahan, T. R. and Rankin, P. S. (2016) Geography of conservation spending, biodiversity, and culture. Conservation Biology, 30 5: 1089-1101. doi:10.1111/cobi.12720

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Author McClanahan, T. R.
Rankin, P. S.
Title Geography of conservation spending, biodiversity, and culture
Journal name Conservation Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1523-1739
0888-8892
Publication date 2016-10-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/cobi.12720
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 30
Issue 5
Start page 1089
End page 1101
Total pages 13
Place of publication Malden, MA, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject 1105 Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
2303 Ecology
Abstract We used linear and multivariate models to examine the associations between geography, biodiversity, per capita economic output, national spending on conservation, governance, and cultural traits in 55 countries. Cultural traits and social metrics of modernization correlated positively with national spending on conservation. The global distribution of this spending culture was poorly aligned with the distribution of biodiversity. Specifically, biodiversity was greater in the tropics where cultures tended to spend relatively less on conservation and tended to have higher collectivism, formalized and hierarchical leadership, and weaker governance. Consequently, nations lacking social traits frequently associated with modernization, environmentalism, and conservation spending have the largest component of Earth's biodiversity. This has significant implications for setting policies and priorities for resource management given that biological diversity is rapidly disappearing and cultural traits change slowly. Therefore, we suggest natural resource management adapt to and use characteristics of existing social organization rather than wait for or promote social values associated with conservation spending. Supporting biocultural traditions, engaging leaders to increase conservation commitments, cross-national efforts that complement attributes of cultures, and avoiding interference with nature may work best to conserve nature in collective and hierarchical societies. Spending in modernized nations may be a symbolic response to a symptom of economic development and environmental degradation, and here conservation actions need to ensure that biodiversity is not being lost.
Keyword Cultural dimensions
Economics
Human development
Governance
Social–ecological
Social traits
Tropical–temperate
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
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School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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