Bioassay battery interlaboratory investigation of emerging contaminants in spiked water extracts – towards the implementation of bioanalytical monitoring tools in water quality assessment and monitoring

Di Paolo, Carolina, Ottermanns, Richard, Keiter, Steffen, Ait-Aissa, Selim, Bluhm, Kerstin, Brack, Werner, Breitholtz, Magnus, Buchinger, Sebastian, Carere, Mario, Chalon, Carole, Cousin, Xavier, Dulio, Valeria, Escher, Beate I., Hamers, Timo, Hilscherova, Klara, Jarque, Sergio, Jonas, Adam, Maillot-Marechal, Emmanuelle, Marneffe, Yves, Nguyen, Mai Thao, Pandard, Pascal, Schifferli, Andrea, Schulze, Tobias, Seidensticker, Sven, Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin, Tang, Janet, van der Oost, Ron, Vermeirssen, Etienne, Zounkova, Radka, Zwart, Nick and Hollert, Henner (2016) Bioassay battery interlaboratory investigation of emerging contaminants in spiked water extracts – towards the implementation of bioanalytical monitoring tools in water quality assessment and monitoring. Water Research, 104 473-484. doi:10.1016/j.watres.2016.08.018

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Author Di Paolo, Carolina
Ottermanns, Richard
Keiter, Steffen
Ait-Aissa, Selim
Bluhm, Kerstin
Brack, Werner
Breitholtz, Magnus
Buchinger, Sebastian
Carere, Mario
Chalon, Carole
Cousin, Xavier
Dulio, Valeria
Escher, Beate I.
Hamers, Timo
Hilscherova, Klara
Jarque, Sergio
Jonas, Adam
Maillot-Marechal, Emmanuelle
Marneffe, Yves
Nguyen, Mai Thao
Pandard, Pascal
Schifferli, Andrea
Schulze, Tobias
Seidensticker, Sven
Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin
Tang, Janet
van der Oost, Ron
Vermeirssen, Etienne
Zounkova, Radka
Zwart, Nick
Hollert, Henner
Title Bioassay battery interlaboratory investigation of emerging contaminants in spiked water extracts – towards the implementation of bioanalytical monitoring tools in water quality assessment and monitoring
Journal name Water Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1879-2448
0043-1354
Publication date 2016-11-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.watres.2016.08.018
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 104
Start page 473
End page 484
Total pages 12
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher I W A Publishing
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Bioassays are particularly useful tools to link the chemical and ecological assessments in water quality monitoring. Different methods cover a broad range of toxicity mechanisms in diverse organisms, and account for risks posed by non-target compounds and mixtures. Many tests are already applied in chemical and waste assessments, and stakeholders from the science-police interface have recommended their integration in regulatory water quality monitoring. Still, there is a need to address bioassay suitability to evaluate water samples containing emerging pollutants, which are a current priority in water quality monitoring. The presented interlaboratory study (ILS) verified whether a battery of miniaturized bioassays, conducted in 11 different laboratories following their own protocols, would produce comparable results when applied to evaluate blinded samples consisting of a pristine water extract spiked with four emerging pollutants as single chemicals or mixtures, i.e. triclosan, acridine, 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) and 3-nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA). Assays evaluated effects on aquatic organisms from three different trophic levels (algae, daphnids, zebrafish embryos) and mechanism-specific effects using in vitro estrogenicity (ER-Luc, YES) and mutagenicity (Ames fluctuation) assays. The test battery presented complementary sensitivity and specificity to evaluate the different blinded water extract spikes. Aquatic organisms differed in terms of sensitivity to triclosan (algae > daphnids > fish) and acridine (fish > daphnids > algae) spikes, confirming the complementary role of the three taxa for water quality assessment. Estrogenicity and mutagenicity assays identified with high precision the respective mechanism-specific effects of spikes even when non-specific toxicity occurred in mixture. For estrogenicity, although differences were observed between assays and models, EE2 spike relative induction EC50 values were comparable to the literature, and E2/EE2 equivalency factors reliably reflected the sample content. In the Ames, strong revertant induction occurred following 3-NBA spike incubation with the TA98 strain, which was of lower magnitude after metabolic transformation and when compared to TA100. Differences in experimental protocols, model organisms, and data analysis can be sources of variation, indicating that respective harmonized standard procedures should be followed when implementing bioassays in water monitoring. Together with other ongoing activities for the validation of a basic bioassay battery, the present study is an important step towards the implementation of bioanalytical monitoring tools in water quality assessment and monitoring.
Keyword 17α-ethinylestradiol
3-Nitrobenzanthrone
Acridine
Mechanism-specific toxicity
Organism-level toxicity
Triclosan
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 11 Oct 2016, 10:38:36 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)