Grey matter volume differences in the left caudate nucleus of people who stutter

Sowman, Paul F., Ryan, Margaret, Johnson, Blake W., Savage, Greg, Crain, Stephen, Harrison, Elisabeth, Martin, Erin and Burianova, Hana (2017) Grey matter volume differences in the left caudate nucleus of people who stutter. Brain and Language, 164 9-15. doi:10.1016/j.bandl.2016.08.009


Author Sowman, Paul F.
Ryan, Margaret
Johnson, Blake W.
Savage, Greg
Crain, Stephen
Harrison, Elisabeth
Martin, Erin
Burianova, Hana
Title Grey matter volume differences in the left caudate nucleus of people who stutter
Journal name Brain and Language   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1090-2155
0093-934X
Publication date 2017-01-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Letter to editor, brief commentary or brief communication
DOI 10.1016/j.bandl.2016.08.009
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 164
Start page 9
End page 15
Total pages 7
Place of publication Maryland Heights, MO, United States
Publisher Academic Press
Language eng
Abstract The cause of stuttering has many theoretical explanations. A number of research groups have suggested changes in the volume and/or function of the striatum as a causal agent. Two recent studies in children and one in adults who stutter (AWS) report differences in striatal volume compared that seen in controls; however, the laterality and nature of this anatomical volume difference is not consistent across studies. The current study investigated whether a reduction in striatal grey matter volume, comparable to that seen in children who stutter (CWS), would be found in AWS. Such a finding would support claims that an anatomical striatal anomaly plays a causal role in stuttering. We used voxel-based morphometry to examine the structure of the striatum in a group of AWS and compared it to that in a group of matched adult control subjects. Results showed a statistically significant group difference for the left caudate nucleus, with smaller mean volume in the group of AWS. The caudate nucleus, one of three main structures within the striatum, is thought to be critical for the planning and modulation of movement sequencing. The difference in striatal volume found here aligns with theoretical accounts of stuttering, which suggest it is a motor control disorder that arises from deficient articulatory movement selection and sequencing. Whilst the current study provides further evidence of a striatal volume difference in stuttering at the group level compared to controls, the significant overlap between AWS and controls suggests this difference is unlikely to be diagnostic of stuttering.
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Letter to editor, brief commentary or brief communication
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Centre for Advanced Imaging Publications
 
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