Does clinician continuity influence hearing aid outcomes?

Bennett, Rebecca J., Meyer, Carly and Eikelboom, Robert H. (2016) Does clinician continuity influence hearing aid outcomes?. International Journal of Audiology, 55 10: 556-563. doi:10.1080/14992027.2016.1185169


Author Bennett, Rebecca J.
Meyer, Carly
Eikelboom, Robert H.
Title Does clinician continuity influence hearing aid outcomes?
Journal name International Journal of Audiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1708-8186
1499-2027
Publication date 2016-10-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/14992027.2016.1185169
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 55
Issue 10
Start page 556
End page 563
Total pages 8
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Language eng
Subject 1203 Language and Linguistics
3310 Linguistics and Language
3616 Speech and Hearing
Abstract Objective: To evaluate whether clinician continuity is associated with successful hearing aid outcomes. Design: A prospective cohort study. Clinician continuity was defined as occurring when a patient was cared for by the same clinician for the hearing assessment, hearing aid selection process, hearing aid fitting and programming, and subsequent hearing aid fine tuning appointments. The hearing aid outcome measures included self-reported hearing aid use, benefit and satisfaction as well as self-reported handling skills and problems experienced with hearing aids. Study sample: Four hundred and sixty-eight adult hearing aid users (mean age 73.9 years +/- 10.9) and 26 qualified audiologists (mean age 34 years +/- 6.34) recruited from a single hearing clinic in Perth, Western Australia. Results: There were no significant differences in hearing aid outcomes between participants who experienced clinician continuity and those who did not. Conclusions: Within a controlled practice setting, hearing aid outcomes may not be adversely effected if services are provided by more than one clinician.
Formatted abstract
Objective: To evaluate whether clinician continuity is associated with successful hearing aid outcomes.

Design: A prospective cohort study. Clinician continuity was defined as occurring when a patient was cared for by the same clinician for the hearing assessment, hearing aid selection process, hearing aid fitting and programming, and subsequent hearing aid fine tuning appointments. The hearing aid outcome measures included self-reported hearing aid use, benefit and satisfaction as well as self-reported handling skills and problems experienced with hearing aids.

Study sample: Four hundred and sixty-eight adult hearing aid users (mean age 73.9 years ±10.9) and 26 qualified audiologists (mean age 34 years ±6.34) recruited from a single hearing clinic in Perth, Western Australia.

Results: There were no significant differences in hearing aid outcomes between participants who experienced clinician continuity and those who did not.

Conclusions: Within a controlled practice setting, hearing aid outcomes may not be adversely effected if services are provided by more than one clinician.
Keyword Clinician continuity
Continuity of care
Hearing aid
Interpersonal continuity
Outcomes
Relational continuity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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