Antimicrobial effects of free nitrous acid on Desulfovibrio vulgaris: implications for sulfide-induced corrosion of concrete

Gao, Shu-Hong, Ho, Jun Yuan, Fan, Lu, Richardson, David J., Yuan, Zhiguo and Bond, Philip L. (2016) Antimicrobial effects of free nitrous acid on Desulfovibrio vulgaris: implications for sulfide-induced corrosion of concrete. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 82 18: 5563-5575. doi:10.1128/AEM.01655-16

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Author Gao, Shu-Hong
Ho, Jun Yuan
Fan, Lu
Richardson, David J.
Yuan, Zhiguo
Bond, Philip L.
Title Antimicrobial effects of free nitrous acid on Desulfovibrio vulgaris: implications for sulfide-induced corrosion of concrete
Formatted title
Antimicrobial effects of free nitrous acid on Desulfovibrio vulgaris: implications for sulfide-induced corrosion of concrete
Journal name Applied and Environmental Microbiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1098-5336
0099-2240
Publication date 2016-09-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1128/AEM.01655-16
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 82
Issue 18
Start page 5563
End page 5575
Total pages 13
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Society for Microbiology
Language eng
Abstract Hydrogen sulfide produced by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in sewers causes odor problems and asset deterioration due to the sulfide-induced concrete corrosion. Free nitrous acid (FNA) was recently demonstrated as a promising antimicrobial agent to alleviate hydrogen sulfide production in sewers. However, details of the antimicrobial mechanisms of FNA are largely unknown. Here, we report the multiple-targeted antimicrobial effects of FNA on the SRB Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough by determining the growth, physiological, and gene expression responses to FNA exposure. The activities of growth, respiration, and ATP generation were inhibited when exposed to FNA. These changes were reflected in the transcript levels detected during exposure. The removal of FNA was evident by nitrite reduction that likely involved nitrite reductase and the poorly characterized hybrid cluster protein, and the genes coding for these proteins were highly expressed. During FNA exposure, lowered ribosome activity and protein production were detected. Additionally, conditions within the cells were more oxidizing, and there was evidence of oxidative stress. Based on an interpretation of the measured responses, we present a model depicting the antimicrobial effects of FNA on D. vulgaris These findings provide new insight for understanding the responses of D. vulgaris to FNA and will provide a foundation for optimal application of this antimicrobial agent for improved control of sewer corrosion and odor management.IMPORTANCE Hydrogen sulfide produced by SRB in sewers causes odor problems and results in serious deterioration of sewer assets that requires very costly and demanding rehabilitation. Currently, there is successful application of the antimicrobial agent free nitrous acid (FNA), the protonated form of nitrite, for the control of sulfide levels in sewers (G. Jiang et al., Water Res 47:4331-4339, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2013.05.024). However, the details of the antimicrobial mechanisms of FNA are largely unknown. In this study, we identified the key responses (decreased anaerobic respiration, reducing FNA, combating oxidative stress, and shutting down protein synthesis) of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a model sewer corrosion bacterium, to FNA exposure by examining the growth, physiological, and gene expression changes. These findings provide new insight and underpinning knowledge for understanding the responses of D. vulgaris to FNA exposure, thereby benefiting the practical application of FNA for improved control of sewer corrosion and odor.
Formatted abstract
Hydrogen sulfide produced by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in sewers causes odor problems and asset deterioration due to the sulfide-induced concrete corrosion. Free nitrous acid (FNA) was recently demonstrated as a promising antimicrobial agent to alleviate hydrogen sulfide production in sewers. However, details of the antimicrobial mechanisms of FNA are largely unknown. Here, we report the multiple-targeted antimicrobial effects of FNA on the SRB Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough by determining the growth, physiological, and gene expression responses to FNA exposure. The activities of growth, respiration, and ATP generation were inhibited when exposed to FNA. These changes were reflected in the transcript levels detected during exposure. The removal of FNA was evident by nitrite reduction that likely involved nitrite reductase and the poorly characterized hybrid cluster protein, and the genes coding for these proteins were highly expressed. During FNA exposure, lowered ribosome activity and protein production were detected. Additionally, conditions within the cells were more oxidizing, and there was evidence of oxidative stress. Based on an interpretation of the measured responses, we present a model depicting the antimicrobial effects of FNA on D. vulgaris. These findings provide new insight for understanding the responses of D. vulgaris to FNA and will provide a foundation for optimal application of this antimicrobial agent for improved control of sewer corrosion and odor management.
Keyword Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology
Microbiology
Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology
Microbiology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID BB/H012796/1
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Advanced Water Management Centre Publications
 
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