Feedforward compensation for novel dynamics depends on force field orientation but is similar for the left and right arms

Reuter, Eva-Maria, Cunnington, Ross, Mattingley, Jason B., Riek, Stephan and Carroll, Timothy (2016) Feedforward compensation for novel dynamics depends on force field orientation but is similar for the left and right arms. Journal of Neurophysiology, 116 5: 2260-2271. doi:10.1152/jn.00425.2016


Author Reuter, Eva-Maria
Cunnington, Ross
Mattingley, Jason B.
Riek, Stephan
Carroll, Timothy
Title Feedforward compensation for novel dynamics depends on force field orientation but is similar for the left and right arms
Journal name Journal of Neurophysiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-3077
1522-1598
Publication date 2016-08-31
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1152/jn.00425.2016
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 116
Issue 5
Start page 2260
End page 2271
Total pages 37
Place of publication Bethesda, MD, United States
Publisher American Physiological Society
Language eng
Subject 2800 Neuroscience
1314 Physiology
Abstract There are well-documented differences in the way that people typically perform identical motor tasks with their dominant and the nondominant arms. According to Yadav and Sainburg's (Neuroscience 196: 153-167, 2011) hybrid-control model, this is because the two arms rely to different degrees on impedance control versus predictive control processes. Here, we assessed whether differences in limb control mechanisms influence the rate of feedforward compensation to a novel dynamic environment. Seventy-five healthy, right-handed participants, divided into four subsamples depending on the arm (left, right) and direction of the force field (ipsilateral, contralateral), reached to central targets in velocity-dependent curl force fields. We assessed the rate at which participants developed predictive compensation for the force field using intermittent error-clamp trials and assessed both kinematic errors and initial aiming angles in the field trials. Participants who were exposed to fields that pushed the limb toward ipsilateral space reduced kinematic errors more slowly, built up less predictive field compensation, and relied more on strategic reaiming than those exposed to contralateral fields. However, there were no significant differences in predictive field compensation or kinematic errors between limbs, suggesting that participants using either the left or the right arm could adapt equally well to novel dynamics. It therefore appears that the distinct preferences in control mechanisms typically observed for the dominant and nondominant arms reflect a default mode that is based on habitual functional requirements rather than an absolute limit in capacity to access the controller specialized for the opposite limb.
Keyword Force field adaptation
Laterality
Motor control
Motor learning
Limb dominance
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 06 Oct 2016, 01:50:40 EST by Sandrine Ducrot on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences