Is an accurate verbal language necessary for heart rate discrimination?

Grigg L. and Ashton R. (1986) Is an accurate verbal language necessary for heart rate discrimination?. Biological Psychology, 22 3: 269-277. doi:10.1016/0301-0511(86)90030-X


Author Grigg L.
Ashton R.
Title Is an accurate verbal language necessary for heart rate discrimination?
Journal name Biological Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0301-0511
Publication date 1986-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/0301-0511(86)90030-X
Volume 22
Issue 3
Start page 269
End page 277
Total pages 9
Subject 2802 Behavioral Neuroscience
3206 Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
Abstract Three groups of subjects were required to discriminate levels of cardiac function over three sessions. Two groups were required to detect in which of two contiguous 4-sec periods their heart rate (HR) was slowest. One of these groups was given knowledge of results concerning the correctness of their decisions. Their performance improved significantly. The other group was not given knowledge of results and their performance hovered around chance level. The third group was told to detect the period in which their heart rate was fastest, but they were told 'correct', via knowledge of results, only if they had picked their slowest rate. Their performance was inferior to the knowledge of results group, but superior to the no-knowledge group. They showed, however, little evidence of improved performance over sessions. The results are discussed in terms of a verbal labelling control of required discriminations.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import - Archived
 
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Created: Tue, 04 Oct 2016, 13:08:52 EST by System User