The viscous stress contribution to lyotropic hydroxypropylcellulose solutions in the biphasic and liquid-crystalline regions

Smyth S.F. and Mackay M.E. (1994) The viscous stress contribution to lyotropic hydroxypropylcellulose solutions in the biphasic and liquid-crystalline regions. Journal of Rheology, 38 5: 1549-1558. doi:10.1122/1.550558


Author Smyth S.F.
Mackay M.E.
Title The viscous stress contribution to lyotropic hydroxypropylcellulose solutions in the biphasic and liquid-crystalline regions
Journal name Journal of Rheology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1520-8516
Publication date 1994-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1122/1.550558
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 38
Issue 5
Start page 1549
End page 1558
Total pages 10
Subject 3104 Condensed Matter Physics
2500 Materials Science
2210 Mechanical Engineering
2211 Mechanics of Materials
2206 Computational Mechanics
3100 Physics and Astronomy
Abstract The rheological properties of polymeric liquid crystals are quite complicated and theories over the last decade and a half have made great progress in explaining this seemingly unique behavior. Most theories have considered only the elastic stress and neglected the viscous stress which can be measured by determining the amount of stress instantaneously lost on cessation of shear. The elastic stress is the stress that is left which subsequently decays with time after cessation. Data is presented that shows the viscous stress contribution determined from shear cessation experiments is present for both the biphasic and liquid-crystalline me so phase of hydroxypropylcellulose-water solutions. This system shows the three regions’for the shear viscosity at higher concentrations. The viscous stress is the dominant contribution at high shear rates, well within region III, and is caused by viscous drag on the molecules. The viscous stress contribution is still present in the intermediate region II although to a lesser extent (approximately 20% of the total); however, as region I is approached it becomes more prominent. We explain this behavior as due to a phenomenon similar to superplasticity by viscous dissipation between domains or within defects.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import - Archived
 
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Created: Tue, 04 Oct 2016, 12:29:27 EST by System User