Hallucinations in adolescents and risk for mental disorders and suicidal behaviour in adulthood: prospective evidence from the MUSP birth cohort study

Connell, Melissa, Betts, Kim, McGrath, John J., Alati, Rosa, Najman, Jake, Clavarino, Alexandra, Mamun, Abdullah, Williams, Gail and Scott, James G. (2016) Hallucinations in adolescents and risk for mental disorders and suicidal behaviour in adulthood: prospective evidence from the MUSP birth cohort study. Schizophrenia Research, 176 2-3: 546-551. doi:10.1016/j.schres.2016.06.009


Author Connell, Melissa
Betts, Kim
McGrath, John J.
Alati, Rosa
Najman, Jake
Clavarino, Alexandra
Mamun, Abdullah
Williams, Gail
Scott, James G.
Title Hallucinations in adolescents and risk for mental disorders and suicidal behaviour in adulthood: prospective evidence from the MUSP birth cohort study
Journal name Schizophrenia Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0920-9964
1573-2509
Publication date 2016-10-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.schres.2016.06.009
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 176
Issue 2-3
Start page 546
End page 551
Total pages 6
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Language eng
Abstract Hallucinations, once equated with serious mental disorders, are common in adolescents. Given the high prevalence of hallucinations, it is important to determine if they are associated with adverse mental health outcomes in adulthood. This study compared the mental health outcomes of participants (aged 30-33years) in the Mater-University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy (MUSP) who reported hallucinations at (a) 14years only and (b) 14 and 21years versus cohort members without hallucinations.
Formatted abstract
Background: Hallucinations, once equated with serious mental disorders, are common in adolescents. Given the high prevalence of hallucinations, it is important to determine if they are associated with adverse mental health outcomes in adulthood. This study compared the mental health outcomes of participants (aged 30-33. years) in the Mater-University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy (MUSP) who reported hallucinations at (a) 14. years only and (b) 14 and 21. years versus cohort members without hallucinations.

Method: Participants (n = 333) were aged between 30 and 33. years and (a) reported hallucinations on the Youth Self-Report Questionnaire at 14 and/or the Young Adult Self-Report Questionnaire at 21. years and (b) controls (n = 321) who did not report hallucinations. Lifetime diagnoses of mental disorders were ascertained by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders (DSM IV-TR) administered by clinical psychologists. Suicidal behaviour was measured by self report.

Results: Hallucinations at 14. years only were not associated with an increased risk of mental disorders in adulthood. Hallucinations reported at both 14 and 21. years were associated with lifetime diagnoses of psychotic disorders (OR, 8.84; 95% CI: 1.61-48.43 and substance use disorders (OR, 2.34; 95% CI: 1.36-4.07) and also strongly associated with lifetime suicide attempts (OR, 7.11; 95% CI: 2.68-18.83).

Conclusions: Most adolescents who experience hallucinations do not have an increased rate of mental disorder in adulthood; however, those with hallucinations that are experienced at more than one point in time are at increased risk of suicidal behaviour and both psychotic and non-psychotic psychopathology.
Keyword Hallucinations
Birth cohort
Mental disorders
Psychotic disorders
Suicide
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID 1046216
1105807
1026598
1056929
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 28 Sep 2016, 02:15:40 EST by Kirstie Asmussen on behalf of School of Music