Detection of explosive vapors: the roles of exciton and molecular diffusion in real-time sensing

Ali, Mohammad A., Shoaee, Safa, Fan, Shengqiang, Burn, Paul L., Gentle, Ian R., Meredith, Paul and Shaw, Paul E. (2016) Detection of explosive vapors: the roles of exciton and molecular diffusion in real-time sensing. ChemPhysChem, 17 21: 3350-3353. doi:10.1002/cphc.201600767


Author Ali, Mohammad A.
Shoaee, Safa
Fan, Shengqiang
Burn, Paul L.
Gentle, Ian R.
Meredith, Paul
Shaw, Paul E.
Title Detection of explosive vapors: the roles of exciton and molecular diffusion in real-time sensing
Journal name ChemPhysChem   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1439-7641
1439-4235
Publication date 2016-09-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Letter to editor, brief commentary or brief communication
DOI 10.1002/cphc.201600767
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 17
Issue 21
Start page 3350
End page 3353
Total pages 5
Place of publication Weinheim, Germany
Publisher Wiley - V C H Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA
Language eng
Abstract Time-resolved quartz crystal microbalance with in situ fluorescence measurements are used to monitor the sorption of the nitroaromatic (explosive) vapor, 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) into a porous pentiptycene-containing poly(phenyleneethynylene) sensing film. Correlation of the nitroaromatic mass uptake with fluorescence quenching shows that the analyte diffusion follows the Case-II transport model, a film-swelling-limited process, in which a sharp diffusional front propagates at a constant velocity through the film. At a low vapor pressure of DNT of approximate to 16 ppb, the analyte concentration in the front is sufficiently high to give an average fluorophore-analyte separation of approximate to 1.5 nm. Hence, a long exciton diffusion length is not required for real-time sensing in the solid state. Rather the diffusion behavior of the analyte and the strength of the binding interaction between the analyte and the polymer play first-order roles in the fluorescence quenching process.
Formatted abstract
Time-resolved quartz crystal microbalance with in situ fluorescence measurements are used to monitor the sorption of the nitroaromatic (explosive) vapor, 2,4 dinitrotoluene (DNT) into a porous pentiptycene-containing poly(phenyleneethynylene) sensing film. Correlation of the nitroaromatic mass uptake with fluorescence quenching shows that the analyte diffusion follows the Case-II transport model, a film-swelling-limited process, in which a sharp diffusional front propagates at a constant velocity through the film. At a low vapor pressure of DNT of ≈16 ppb, the analyte concentration in the front is sufficiently high to give an average fluorophore–analyte separation of ≈ 1.5 nm. Hence, a long exciton diffusion length is not required for real-time sensing in the solid state. Rather the diffusion behavior of the analyte and the strength of the binding interaction between the analyte and the polymer play first-order roles in the fluorescence quenching process.
Keyword Chemistry, Physical
Physics, Atomic, Molecular & Chemical
Chemistry
Physics
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID DE120101721
DP130102422
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Letter to editor, brief commentary or brief communication
Collections: Centre for Organic Photonics and Electronics
School of Mathematics and Physics
HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
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Created: Tue, 27 Sep 2016, 21:49:40 EST by Mrs Louise Nimwegen on behalf of School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences