Future-oriented thought patterns associated with anxiety and depression in later life: the intriguing prospects of prospection

Miloyan, Beyon, Pachana, Nancy A. and Suddendorf, Thomas (2016) Future-oriented thought patterns associated with anxiety and depression in later life: the intriguing prospects of prospection. The Gerontologist: a journal of the Gerontological Society of America, 57 4: 619-625. doi:10.1093/geront/gnv695


Author Miloyan, Beyon
Pachana, Nancy A.
Suddendorf, Thomas
Title Future-oriented thought patterns associated with anxiety and depression in later life: the intriguing prospects of prospection
Journal name The Gerontologist: a journal of the Gerontological Society of America   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0016-9013
1758-5341
Publication date 2016-02-13
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/geront/gnv695
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 57
Issue 4
Start page 619
End page 625
Total pages 7
Place of publication Cary, NC, United States
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Abstract Anxiety and mood disorders in later life are the focus of an increasing amount of intervention research, however basic mechanisms and paradigms explaining etiology and maintenance warrant further exploration. Research on future-oriented thought patterns associated with anxiety and depression in this age group may prove useful, as these disorders are both characterized by a tendency to generate and fixate on threat-related future scenarios that may or may not materialize. Additionally, depression is associated with a reduced expectancy of positive future events. In this paper, we review the literature relevant to future thinking in anxiety and depression in older adults. We focus on the mental construction and anticipation of negative future events, and their underlying neurocognitive mechanisms. We then consider clinical and research implications of anxious and depressive future-oriented thought patterns for older adults. We believe that more research investigating future-oriented thought patterns associated with emotional disorders in later life could improve conceptualization, measurement, and perhaps potential treatments for late-life anxiety and depression.
Keyword Late life
Anxiety
Depression
Episodic foresight
Prospection
Older adults
Cognitive
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes http://gerontologist.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2016/02/12/geront.gnv695.abstract

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 27 Sep 2016, 19:30:07 EST by Thomas Suddendorf on behalf of School of Psychology