Neural changes induced by antipsychotic administration in adolescence: a review of studies in laboratory rodents

Moe, Aung Aung Kywe, Scott, James G., Burne, Thomas H. J. and Eyles, Darryl W. (2016) Neural changes induced by antipsychotic administration in adolescence: a review of studies in laboratory rodents. Journal of Psychopharmacology, 30 8: 771-794. doi:10.1177/0269881116654776


Author Moe, Aung Aung Kywe
Scott, James G.
Burne, Thomas H. J.
Eyles, Darryl W.
Title Neural changes induced by antipsychotic administration in adolescence: a review of studies in laboratory rodents
Journal name Journal of Psychopharmacology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1461-7285
0269-8811
Publication date 2016-08-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0269881116654776
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 30
Issue 8
Start page 771
End page 794
Total pages 24
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
Language eng
Abstract Adolescence is characterized by major remodelling processes in the brain. Use of antipsychotic drugs (APDs) in adolescents has increased dramatically in the last 20 years; however, our understanding of the neurobiological consequences of APD treatment on the adolescent brain has not kept the same pace and significant concerns have been raised. In this review, we examined currently available preclinical studies of the effects of APDs on the adolescent brain. In animal models of neuropsychiatric disorders, adolescent APD treatment appears to be protective against selected structural, behavioural and neurochemical phenotypes. In neurodevelopmentally normal adolescent animals, a range of short- and long-term alterations in behaviour and neurochemistry have been reported. In particular, the adolescent brain appears to be sensitive to long-term locomotor/reward effects of chronic atypical APDs in contrast with the outcomes in adults. Long-lasting changes in dopaminergic, glutamatergic and gamma-amino butyric acid-ergic systems induced by adolescent APD administration have been observed in the nucleus accumbens. A detailed examination of other potential target regions such as striatum, prefrontal cortex and ventral tegmental area is still required. Through identification of specific neural pathways targeted by adolescent APD treatment, future studies will expand the current knowledge on long-term neural outcomes which are of translational value.
Formatted abstract
Adolescence is characterized by major remodelling processes in the brain. Use of antipsychotic drugs (APDs) in adolescents has increased dramatically in the last 20 years; however, our understanding of the neurobiological consequences of APD treatment on the adolescent brain has not kept the same pace and significant concerns have been raised. In this review, we examined currently available preclinical studies of the effects of APDs on the adolescent brain. In animal models of neuropsychiatric disorders, adolescent APD treatment appears to be protective against selected structural, behavioural and neurochemical phenotypes. In "neurodevelopmentally normal" adolescent animals, a range of short- and long-term alterations in behaviour and neurochemistry have been reported. In particular, the adolescent brain appears to be sensitive to long-term locomotor/reward effects of chronic atypical APDs in contrast with the outcomes in adults. Long-lasting changes in dopaminergic, glutamatergic and gamma-amino butyric acid-ergic systems induced by adolescent APD administration have been observed in the nucleus accumbens. A detailed examination of other potential target regions such as striatum, prefrontal cortex and ventral tegmental area is still required. Through identification of specific neural pathways targeted by adolescent APD treatment, future studies will expand the current knowledge on long-term neural outcomes which are of translational value.
Keyword Adolescent
Animal models
Antipsychotic drugs
Behaviour
Dopamine
Neurochemistry
Preclinical
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID 1042259
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
HERDC Pre-Audit
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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