Differentiating between stopover and staging sites: functions of the southern and northern Yellow Sea for long-distance migratory shorebirds

Ma, Zhijun, Hua, Ning, Peng, Hebo, Choi, Chiyeung, Battley, Phil F., Zhou, Qianyan, Chen, Ying, Ma, Qiang, Jia, Na, Xue, Wenjie, Bai, Qingquan, Wu, Wei, Feng, Xuesong and Tang, Chendong (2013) Differentiating between stopover and staging sites: functions of the southern and northern Yellow Sea for long-distance migratory shorebirds. Journal of Avian Biology, 44 5: 504-512. doi:10.1111/j.1600-048X.2013.00213.x


Author Ma, Zhijun
Hua, Ning
Peng, Hebo
Choi, Chiyeung
Battley, Phil F.
Zhou, Qianyan
Chen, Ying
Ma, Qiang
Jia, Na
Xue, Wenjie
Bai, Qingquan
Wu, Wei
Feng, Xuesong
Tang, Chendong
Title Differentiating between stopover and staging sites: functions of the southern and northern Yellow Sea for long-distance migratory shorebirds
Journal name Journal of Avian Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0908-8857
1600-048X
Publication date 2013-09-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1600-048X.2013.00213.x
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 44
Issue 5
Start page 504
End page 512
Total pages 9
Place of publication West Sussex United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Evidence-based protection of migratory birds at flyway levels requires a solid understanding of their use of 'stopping sites' during migration. To characterize the site use of northward-migration great knots Calidris tenuirostris in China, we compared length of stay and fuel deposition during northward migration at areas in the south and the north of the Yellow Sea, a region critical for migrating shorebirds. Radio-tracking showed that at the southern site great knots stayed for only short periods (2.3 ± 1.9 d, n = 40), and bird captures showed that they did not increase their mean body mass while there. In the north birds stayed for 1 month (31.0 ± 13.6 d, n = 22) and almost doubled their mean body mass. Fuel consumption models suggest that great knots departing from the northern Yellow Sea should be able to fly nonstop to the breeding grounds, whereas those from the south would require a refueling stop further north. These results indicate that the study sites in the northern and southern Yellow Sea serve different roles: the southern site acts as a temporary stopover area that enables birds with low fuel stores to make it to main staging areas further north, while the northern site serves as the critical staging site where birds refuel for the next leg of their migration. The rapid turnover rate in the southern Yellow Sea indicates that many more birds use that area than are indicated by peak counts. Differential use of the southern and northern sites indicates that both play crucial roles in the ability of great knots to migrate successfully.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 12 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 15 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 19 Sep 2016, 21:32:14 EST by System User on behalf of School of Biological Sciences