Associations between the group processes of bullying and adolescent substance use

Quinn, Catherine A., Fitzpatrick, Sally, Bussey, Kay, Hides, Leanne and Chan, Gary C. K. (2016) Associations between the group processes of bullying and adolescent substance use. Addictive Behaviors, 62 6-13. doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.06.007

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Quinn, Catherine A.
Fitzpatrick, Sally
Bussey, Kay
Hides, Leanne
Chan, Gary C. K.
Title Associations between the group processes of bullying and adolescent substance use
Journal name Addictive Behaviors   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1873-6327
0306-4603
Publication date 2016-11-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.06.007
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 62
Start page 6
End page 13
Total pages 8
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Language eng
Subject 2701 Medicine (miscellaneous)
3203 Clinical Psychology
3005 Toxicology
2738 Psychiatry and Mental health
Abstract The adverse impact of bullying and victimization on substance use among youth has received increasing attention. Bullying is a specific type of aggressive behavior that not only involves bullies and victims but also followers, who actively support or reinforce the bully; defenders, who intervene to defend or assist the victim; or outsiders who passively observe or ignore the bullying. Limited research to date has linked these five bullying role behaviors to substance use. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between each of the bullying role behaviors and adolescent alcohol and tobacco use. Participants were 1255 (748 female) students (M-age = 15.3, age range: 13-17 years) in Grades 9 (n = 714) and 11 (n = 541). Bullying role behaviors, alcohol and tobacco onset and intensity, and alcohol-related harms were assessed. Results revealed an association between pro bullying behavior (bullying and following) and all substance use variables, and between defender behavior and smoking and alcohol-related harm. No relationship between victimization, or outsider behavior, and substance use was found after controlling for the other bullying roles. The findings highlight the complex relationship between bullying roles, alcohol and tobacco use and alcohol-related harm in adolescents. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Formatted abstract
The adverse impact of bullying and victimization on substance use among youth has received increasing attention. Bullying is a specific type of aggressive behavior that not only involves bullies and victims but also followers, who actively support or reinforce the bully; defenders, who intervene to defend or assist the victim; or outsiders who passively observe or ignore the bullying. Limited research to date has linked these five bullying role behaviors to substance use. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between each of the bullying role behaviors and adolescent alcohol and tobacco use. Participants were 1255 (748 female) students (Mage = 15.3, age range: 13-17 years) in Grades 9 (n = 714) and 11 (n = 541). Bullying role behaviors, alcohol and tobacco onset and intensity, and alcohol-related harms were assessed. Results revealed an association between pro-bullying behavior (bullying and following) and all substance use variables, and between defender behavior and smoking and alcohol-related harm. No relationship between victimization, or outsider behavior, and substance use was found after controlling for the other bullying roles. The findings highlight the complex relationship between bullying roles, alcohol and tobacco use and alcohol-related harm in adolescents.
Keyword Adolescent
Alcohol
Bully
Defender
Tobacco
Victim
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID FT120100780
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Centre for Youth Substance Abuse Research Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 18 Sep 2016, 10:15:50 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)