Shaping travels and land use with bus rapid transit: a developed city’s visualisation with smartcard and census data

Zhou, Jiangping, Sipe, Neil, Mateo-Babiano, Derlie, Darchen, Sebastien and Rowe, Warren (2016) Shaping travels and land use with bus rapid transit: a developed city’s visualisation with smartcard and census data. Regional Studies, Regional Science, 3 1: 506-508. doi:10.1080/21681376.2016.1244775


Author Zhou, Jiangping
Sipe, Neil
Mateo-Babiano, Derlie
Darchen, Sebastien
Rowe, Warren
Title Shaping travels and land use with bus rapid transit: a developed city’s visualisation with smartcard and census data
Journal name Regional Studies, Regional Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2168-1376
Publication date 2016-12-21
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/21681376.2016.1244775
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 3
Issue 1
Start page 506
End page 508
Total pages 3
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Transit and land-use integration is regarded as one of the most important means of avoiding or reducing car dependence and urban sprawl, which are thought as major culprits of unsustainability. In developing countries, rail rapid transit could be too expensive to become the predominant component of their respective systems. However, bus rapid transit (BRT) as one of the cheapest forms of mass transit is a better alternative for those countries. In developing countries, BRT has transformed numerous cities such as Curitiba, Brazil; Bogota, Columbia; and Guangzhou, China. Can BRT have the same transformative impacts for cities in developed countries as well? Can the impacts of BRT be visualized using the transit population? Given that few cities in developed countries have BRT and ridership data of BRT are not always available, the above questions have not been well addressed before. To answer these two questions, we analysed smartcard swipes over a five-day weekday period (11–15 March 2013) for Brisbane in Queensland, Australia, and reconstructed trip trajectories of those 255,887 transit riders. We found that BRT serves a significant percentage and number of travellers, thus shaping travel behaviour and ultimately land use – when transit ridership and rate of transit usage are used as indicators. This is a significant achievement in Australia, a country known for its car dependence and urban sprawl.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
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Created: Sun, 18 Sep 2016, 06:12:49 EST by Dr Iderlina Mateo-Babiano on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management