"Who's afraid?": attitudes of midwives to the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for delivery of pregnancy-related health information

Dalton, J. A., Rodger, D. L., Wilmore, M., Skuse, A. J., Humphreys, S., Flabouris, M. and Clifton, V. L. (2014) "Who's afraid?": attitudes of midwives to the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for delivery of pregnancy-related health information. Women and Birth, 27 3: 168-173. doi:10.1016/j.wombi.2014.06.010


Author Dalton, J. A.
Rodger, D. L.
Wilmore, M.
Skuse, A. J.
Humphreys, S.
Flabouris, M.
Clifton, V. L.
Title "Who's afraid?": attitudes of midwives to the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for delivery of pregnancy-related health information
Journal name Women and Birth   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1878-1799
1871-5192
Publication date 2014-09-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2014.06.010
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 27
Issue 3
Start page 168
End page 173
Total pages 6
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background

Usage rates for information and communication technologies (ICTs) in healthcare have been increasing in recent years, but often lag behind general usage rates for populations as a whole. Research into such differential rates of ICT use across different segments of the population has identified a number of possible causal factors that limit usage.

Aim

The research investigated midwives’ attitudes and experiences of ICT use to identify potential causal factors that encourage or inhibit their usage in antenatal care.

Methods

Semi-structured interviews, focus groups and short surveys were conducted with midwives who provide antenatal education at an Australian metropolitan hospital. Thematic and statistical analyses were used to interpret the data.

Findings

Although midwives recognised the potential benefits of using ICTs to deliver pregnancy-related health information many had reservations about their use in everyday work. These reservations centred on lack of training in use of ICTs, the perceived legal risks associated with social media, potential violations of patient privacy, misdiagnosis and misunderstandings between midwife and client.

Conclusion

Midwives face a number of barriers to effective use of ICTs in healthcare including material access, skills access, usage access and motivational access. Motivational access appears to be a key concern due to the high perception of risk associated with social media in particular. Reducing the motivational barriers through a range of interventions with midwifery staff may assist in overcoming other barriers to ICT use in antenatal care. Further research is required to determine whether these findings are generalisable to other healthcare contexts.
Keyword Information and communication technologies
ICTs
Social media
Antenatal education
Health communication
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Mater Health Services Publications
 
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