Quantitative studies on bacteria and algae in the food of the mullet Mugil cephalus L. and the prawn Metapenaeus bennettae (Racek & Dall)

Moriarty D.J.W. (1976) Quantitative studies on bacteria and algae in the food of the mullet Mugil cephalus L. and the prawn Metapenaeus bennettae (Racek & Dall). Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, 22 2: 131-143. doi:10.1016/0022-0981(76)90090-3


Author Moriarty D.J.W.
Title Quantitative studies on bacteria and algae in the food of the mullet Mugil cephalus L. and the prawn Metapenaeus bennettae (Racek & Dall)
Journal name Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-0981
Publication date 1976-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/0022-0981(76)90090-3
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 22
Issue 2
Start page 131
End page 143
Total pages 13
Subject 1104 Complementary and Alternative Medicine
1105 Dentistry
2303 Ecology
Abstract The biomass of bacteria ingested by two deposit-feeding animals has been estimated by measuring the muramic acid in their gut contents. Bacteria comprised about 15 to 30 % of the organic carbon in the stomach of the mullet Mugil cephalus L. feeding on sea-grass flats and about 20 to 35 % of organic carbon in the proventriculus of the prawn Metapenaeus bennettae (Racek & Dall) feeding on muddy estuarine sediments. Diatoms made up about 20 to 30 % of the carbon in the mullet stomachs, but algae were unimportant in the food of most of the prawns examined. In the mullet stomachs, total organic carbon was about 2 to 3 % of ash weight, an increase of 10 to 20 fold over that in the in situ sediments. The prawns were much more selective in their feeding since the organic carbon was about 30 to 45 % of ash weight in the proventriculus. In laboratory experiments, five species of bacteria and one blue-green alga were digested and assimilated by the prawns. The highest percentage assimilation was > 90 % and this is interpreted to indicate that micro-organisms passing into the digestive gland were nearly completely digested whereas those which passed directly from the proventriculus to the mid-gut were poorly digested. Evidence is presented which suggests that the mullet feed only during the day and not at night on the sea-grass flats. A regression equation is given for the dry weight of sediment in the full gut on fresh weight of fish. A calculation of the amount of sediment (and hence bacteria and algae) eaten per day by a given fish, exemplifies the application of the available tentative data.
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import - Archived
 
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Created: Tue, 13 Sep 2016, 14:50:38 EST by System User