“Before I'd Be a Slave, I'd Be Buried in My Grave, and Go Home to My Lord and Be Free”

Hutch R.A. (1995) “Before I'd Be a Slave, I'd Be Buried in My Grave, and Go Home to My Lord and Be Free”. The International Journal for the Psychology of Religion, 5 3: 171-176. doi:10.1207/s15327582ijpr0503_2


Author Hutch R.A.
Title “Before I'd Be a Slave, I'd Be Buried in My Grave, and Go Home to My Lord and Be Free”
Journal name The International Journal for the Psychology of Religion   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1532-7582
Publication date 1995-07-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1207/s15327582ijpr0503_2
Volume 5
Issue 3
Start page 171
End page 176
Total pages 6
Subject 1212 Religious studies
3200 Psychology
Abstract The question addressed is, Does participation in new religions lead to mental illness (argument of the so-called “cult-busters”) or to mental health (argument of James Richardson), or is some other option possible? The answer is that the debate founders on a mistaken emphasis on the “mind” (e.g., “brainwashing,” “mind control,” “deprogramming”). The way out of the impasse is to stress the “body” and to ask how participation in new religions implies a reckoning with human mortality, dying, and death. This includes reckoning with tragic death, as is evident in the Manson “Family” in 1969, the People's Temple in Jonestown in 1978, and the Branch Davidians in Waco in 1993. Two models of how the mind is understood as either mentally ill or healthy and one model of how the self can be construed when the body is paramount in research are presented.
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import - Archived
 
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Created: Tue, 13 Sep 2016, 11:52:57 EST by System User