Studies on the behaviour of the oncomiracidia of the monogenean parasites hexabothrium appendiculatum and leptocotyle minor from the common dogfish, scyliorhinus canicula

Whittington I.D. (1987) Studies on the behaviour of the oncomiracidia of the monogenean parasites hexabothrium appendiculatum and leptocotyle minor from the common dogfish, scyliorhinus canicula. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 67 4: 773-784. doi:10.1017/S0025315400057027


Author Whittington I.D.
Title Studies on the behaviour of the oncomiracidia of the monogenean parasites hexabothrium appendiculatum and leptocotyle minor from the common dogfish, scyliorhinus canicula
Journal name Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1469-7769
Publication date 1987-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0025315400057027
Volume 67
Issue 4
Start page 773
End page 784
Total pages 12
Subject 1104 Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Abstract The gill-parasitic polyopisthocotylean monogenean, Hexabothrium appendiculatum and the skin-parasitic microbothriid monogenean, Leptocotyle minor share the same host, the common dogfish Scyliorhinus canicula. The larvae of these parasites are stimulated to hatch by host skin secretions and the behaviour patterns of these larvae have been found to be remarkably similar. The freshly hatched oncomiracidia of both parasites rarely remain swimming (in the presence of hatching stimulants) for more than 30 min; there is a strong tendency for the larvae to attach themselves temporarily or permanently by either the anterior or posterior ends to glass or Perspex surfaces. Other important features of the behaviour of these oncomiracidia are their erratic mode of swimming and their apparent lack of response to environmental stimuli such as light, shadows, mechanical disturbance or water currents. There is some evidence that the swimming oncomiracidia of both parasites may be negatively geotactic after hatching but this response is weak and of short duration. The erratic swimming pattern, the lack of response to environmental factors and the readiness to attach to available surfaces seem likely to be particularly favourable for the establishment of larvae on the surfaces of dogfishes foraging at the sea bottom and providing the hatching stimulus for drifting eggs.
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import - Archived
 
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