Conflict, Stereotypes and Masculinity in Australian and New Zealand Surfing

Pearson K. (1982) Conflict, Stereotypes and Masculinity in Australian and New Zealand Surfing. Journal of Sociology, 18 2: 117-135. doi:10.1177/144078338201800201


Author Pearson K.
Title Conflict, Stereotypes and Masculinity in Australian and New Zealand Surfing
Journal name Journal of Sociology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1741-2978
Publication date 1982-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/144078338201800201
Volume 18
Issue 2
Start page 117
End page 135
Total pages 19
Subject 3312 Sociology and Political Science
1900 Earth and Planetary Sciences
2300 Environmental Science
Abstract Surf board riding and surf life saving, two distinctively Australian and New Zealand sports were described in terms of important background features in an article published in the previous issue. Attention was drawn to the 1960s as a period in which conflict occurred between members of the two groups. Tensions between the groups have remained since that time. The present article examines aspects of these tensions in detail showing they have served to crystallise some inherent philosophical contrasts between each type of surfing activity. Data are presented as part of an examination of the many contrasts and tensions between the two groups. Despite the contrasts, the subculture of each surfing group share a similar characteristic masculinity. This article discusses this similarity as well as some of the continuing differences between each sport pattern.
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import - Archived
 
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Created: Tue, 13 Sep 2016, 10:34:19 EST by System User