Social Class Differences in Taxonomic Skills: A matter of preference or habit, rather than competence

Catherwood D. and Brown C. (1989) Social Class Differences in Taxonomic Skills: A matter of preference or habit, rather than competence. Educational Psychology, 9 1: 45-51. doi:10.1080/0144341890090105


Author Catherwood D.
Brown C.
Title Social Class Differences in Taxonomic Skills: A matter of preference or habit, rather than competence
Journal name Educational Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1469-5820
Publication date 1989-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/0144341890090105
Volume 9
Issue 1
Start page 45
End page 51
Total pages 7
Subject 3204 Developmental and Educational Psychology
3205 Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
3304 Education
Abstract The taxonomic sorting responses of 56 lower-class and 56 middle-class children from two age groups (mean ages for these being 8 years 4 months and 12 years 3 months) were assessed under two instructional conditions. One condition involved ‘explicit’ cues to sort the task items taxonomically and the other condition involved only an implicit’ requirement to do so. The social class groups sorted equally well under the ‘explicit’ instructions, but under the ‘implicit’ conditions, the performance of the younger lower-class children was significantly poorer than that of the younger middle-class children. The results are considered in terms of a discrepancy between performance (habit or preference) and competence in taxonomic tasks for younger lower-class children.
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import - Archived
 
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Created: Tue, 13 Sep 2016, 10:19:48 EST by System User