The neurobiology of "food addiction" and its implications for obesity treatment and policy

Carter, Adrian, Hendrikse, Joshua, Lee, Natalia, Yucel, Murat, Verdejo-Garcia, Antonio, Andrews, Zane and Hall, Wayne (2016) The neurobiology of "food addiction" and its implications for obesity treatment and policy. Annual Review of Nutrition, 36 105-128. doi:10.1146/annurev-nutr-071715-050909


Author Carter, Adrian
Hendrikse, Joshua
Lee, Natalia
Yucel, Murat
Verdejo-Garcia, Antonio
Andrews, Zane
Hall, Wayne
Title The neurobiology of "food addiction" and its implications for obesity treatment and policy
Journal name Annual Review of Nutrition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1545-4312
0199-9885
Publication date 2016-07-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1146/annurev-nutr-071715-050909
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 36
Start page 105
End page 128
Total pages 24
Place of publication Palo Alto, CA, United States
Publisher Annual Reviews
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract There is a growing view that certain foods, particularly those high in refined sugars and fats, are addictive and that some forms of obesity can usefully be treated as a food addiction. This perspective is supported by a growing body of neuroscience research demonstrating that the chronic consumption of energy-dense foods causes changes in the brain's reward pathway that are central to the development and maintenance of drug addiction. Obese and overweight individuals also display patterns of eating behavior that resemble the ways in which addicted individuals consume drugs. We critically review the evidence that some forms of obesity or overeating could be considered a food addiction and argue that the use of food addiction as a diagnostic category is premature. We also examine some of the potential positive and negative clinical, social, and public policy implications of describing obesity as a food addiction that require further investigation.
Keyword Food addiction
Neuroscience
Obesity
Policy
Stigma
Treatment
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
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Centre for Youth Substance Abuse Research Publications
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