Metarhizium anisopliae infection alters feeding and trophallactic behavior in the ant Solenopsis invicta

Qiu, Hua-Long, Lu, Li-Hua, Zalucki, M. P. and He, Yu-Rong (2016) Metarhizium anisopliae infection alters feeding and trophallactic behavior in the ant Solenopsis invicta. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology, 138 24-29. doi:10.1016/j.jip.2016.05.005

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ404218_OA.pdf Full text (open access) application/pdf 1.72MB 0

Author Qiu, Hua-Long
Lu, Li-Hua
Zalucki, M. P.
He, Yu-Rong
Title Metarhizium anisopliae infection alters feeding and trophallactic behavior in the ant Solenopsis invicta
Formatted title
Metarhizium anisopliae infection alters feeding and trophallactic behavior in the ant Solenopsis invicta
Journal name Journal of Invertebrate Pathology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1096-0805
0022-2011
Publication date 2016-07-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jip.2016.05.005
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 138
Start page 24
End page 29
Total pages 6
Place of publication Maryland Heights, MO, United States
Publisher Academic Press
Language eng
Subject 1105 Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Abstract In social insects, social behavior may be changed in a way that preventing the spread of pathogens. We infected workers of the ant Solenopsis invicta with an entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae and then videotaped and/or measured worker feeding and trophallactic behavior. Results showed that fungal infected S. invicta enhanced their preference for bitter alkaloid chemical quinine on 3 days after inoculation, which might be self-medication of S. invicta by ingesting more alkaloid substances in response to pathogenic infection. Furthermore, infected ants devoted more time to trophallactic behavior with their nestmates on 3 days post inoculation, in return receiving more food. Increased interactions between exposed ants and their naive nestmates suggest the existence of social immunity in S. invicta. Overall, our study indicates that S. invicta may use behavioral defenses such as self-medication and social immunity in response to a M. anisopliae infection. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier Inc.
Formatted abstract
In social insects, social behavior may be changed in a way that preventing the spread of pathogens. We infected workers of the ant Solenopsis invicta with an entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae and then videotaped and/or measured worker feeding and trophallactic behavior. Results showed that fungal infected S. invicta enhanced their preference for bitter alkaloid chemical quinine on 3 days after inoculation, which might be self-medication of S. invicta by ingesting more alkaloid substances in response to pathogenic infection. Furthermore, infected ants devoted more time to trophallactic behavior with their nestmates on 3 days post inoculation, in return receiving more food. Increased interactions between exposed ants and their naive nestmates suggest the existence of social immunity in S. invicta. Overall, our study indicates that S. invicta may use behavioral defenses such as self-medication and social immunity in response to a M. anisopliae infection.
Keyword Entomopathogenic fungi
Immunity
Red imported fire ant
Social behavior
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID 2011B031500020
2013J4500032
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 11 Sep 2016, 10:28:00 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)