Can a professional development workshop with follow-up alter practitioner behaviour and outcomes for neck pain patients? A randomised controlled trial

Chipchase, L. S., Cavaleri, R. and Jull, G. (2016) Can a professional development workshop with follow-up alter practitioner behaviour and outcomes for neck pain patients? A randomised controlled trial. Manual Therapy, 25 87-93. doi:10.1016/j.math.2016.06.010

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Author Chipchase, L. S.
Cavaleri, R.
Jull, G.
Title Can a professional development workshop with follow-up alter practitioner behaviour and outcomes for neck pain patients? A randomised controlled trial
Journal name Manual Therapy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1532-2769
1356-689X
Publication date 2016-09-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.math.2016.06.010
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 25
Start page 87
End page 93
Total pages 7
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Churchill Livingstone
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background

Continuing professional development (CPD) is a fundamental component of physiotherapy practice. Follow-up sessions provide opportunity for the refinement of skills developed during CPD workshops. However, it is necessary to identify if such opportunity translates to improved physiotherapist performance and patient outcomes.

Objectives

To determine whether a traditional CPD workshop with a follow-up session with the educator is more likely to change physiotherapists' practice behaviour and patient outcomes than a traditional workshop with no opportunity for follow-up.

Design

A single-blind, randomised controlled trial.

Methods

Participants were stratified and randomly allocated to the intervention and control groups. The control group participated in a two-day workshop dedicated towards the management of neck disorders. The intervention group completed the two-day workshop and attended a five-hour follow-up session one month later. Outcome measures included self-reported physiotherapist practice behaviour and confidence, as well as patient clinical outcomes using the Neck Disability Index.

Results

While all participants exhibited changes in confidence and practice behaviours, between-group differences were not significant for any response (p > 0.05). There were also no significant differences between the groups in terms of patient outcomes (Neck Disability Index: F = 0.36, p = 0.56).

Conclusion

A single follow-up session to a traditional workshop is insufficient to significantly influence practice behaviours or patient outcomes.
Keyword Professional development
Neck pain
Patient outcomes
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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