A tool for assessing case history and feedback skills in audiology students working with simulated patients

Hughes, Jane, Wilson, Wayne J., MacBean, Naomi and Hill, Anne E. (2016) A tool for assessing case history and feedback skills in audiology students working with simulated patients. International Journal of Audiology, 55 12: 1-10. doi:10.1080/14992027.2016.1214758


Author Hughes, Jane
Wilson, Wayne J.
MacBean, Naomi
Hill, Anne E.
Title A tool for assessing case history and feedback skills in audiology students working with simulated patients
Journal name International Journal of Audiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1708-8186
1499-2027
Publication date 2016-08-17
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/14992027.2016.1214758
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 55
Issue 12
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Language eng
Subject 1203 Language and Linguistics
3310 Linguistics and Language
3616 Speech and Hearing
Abstract Objective: To develop a tool for assessing audiology students taking a case history and giving feedback with simulated patients (SP). Design: Single observation, single group design. Study sample: Twenty-four first-year audiology students, five simulated patients, two clinical educators, and three evaluators. Results: The Audiology Simulated Patient Interview Rating Scale (ASPIRS) was developed consisting of six items assessing specific clinical skills, non-verbal communication, verbal communication, interpersonal skills, interviewing skills, and professional practice skills. These items are applied once for taking a case history and again for giving feedback. The ASPIRS showed very high internal consistency (=0.91-0.97; mean inter-item r=0.64-0.85) and fair-to-moderate agreement between evaluators (29.2-54.2% exact and 79.2-100% near agreement; (weighted) up to 0.60). It also showed fair-to-moderate absolute agreement amongst evaluators for single evaluator scores (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] r=0.35-0.59) and substantial consistency of agreement amongst evaluators for three-evaluator averaged scores (ICC r=0.62-0.81). Factor analysis showed the ASPIRS' 12 items fell into two components, one containing all feedback items and one containing all case history items. Conclusion: The ASPIRS shows promise as the first published tool for assessing audiology students taking a case history and giving feedback with an SP.
Formatted abstract
Objective: To develop a tool for assessing audiology students taking a case history and giving feedback with simulated patients (SP).

Design: Single observation, single group design.

Study sample: Twenty-four first-year audiology students, five simulated patients, two clinical educators, and three evaluators.

Results: The Audiology Simulated Patient Interview Rating Scale (ASPIRS) was developed consisting of six items assessing specific clinical skills, non-verbal communication, verbal communication, interpersonal skills, interviewing skills, and professional practice skills. These items are applied once for taking a case history and again for giving feedback. The ASPIRS showed very high internal consistency (α = 0.91–0.97; mean inter-item r = 0.64–0.85) and fair-to-moderate agreement between evaluators (29.2–54.2% exact and 79.2–100% near agreement; κweighted up to 0.60). It also showed fair-to-moderate absolute agreement amongst evaluators for single evaluator scores (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] r = 0.35–0.59) and substantial consistency of agreement amongst evaluators for three-evaluator averaged scores (ICC r = 0.62–0.81). Factor analysis showed the ASPIRS’ 12 items fell into two components, one containing all feedback items and one containing all case history items.

Conclusion: The ASPIRS shows promise as the first published tool for assessing audiology students taking a case history and giving feedback with an SP.
Keyword Simulated patients
Student assessment
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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