The effect of surfactant chain length on the morphology of poly(methyl methacrylate) microcapsules for fragrance oil encapsulation

Tasker, Alison Louise, Hitchcock, James Paul, He, Ling, Baxter, Elaine Alice, Biggs, Simon and Cayre, Olivier Jean (2016) The effect of surfactant chain length on the morphology of poly(methyl methacrylate) microcapsules for fragrance oil encapsulation. Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 484 10-16. doi:10.1016/j.jcis.2016.08.058


Author Tasker, Alison Louise
Hitchcock, James Paul
He, Ling
Baxter, Elaine Alice
Biggs, Simon
Cayre, Olivier Jean
Title The effect of surfactant chain length on the morphology of poly(methyl methacrylate) microcapsules for fragrance oil encapsulation
Journal name Journal of Colloid and Interface Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0021-9797
1095-7103
Publication date 2016-08-24
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jcis.2016.08.058
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 484
Start page 10
End page 16
Total pages 17
Place of publication Maryland Heights, United States
Publisher Academic Press
Language eng
Abstract The solvent evaporation method for producing microcapsules relies upon the correct wetting conditions between the three phases involved in the synthesis to allow core-shell morphologies to form. By measuring the interfacial tensions between the oil, polymer and aqueous phases, spreading coefficients can be calculated, allowing the capsule morphology to be predicted. In this work we explore the effect of surfactant chain length on capsule morphology using poly(methyl methacrylate) as the polymer and hexadecane as the core. We compared the predicted morphologies obtained using the polymer as a solid, and the polymer dissolved in dichloromethane to represent the point at which capsule formation begins. We found that using the polymer in its final, solid form gave predictions which were more consistent with our observations. The method was applied to successfully predict the capsule morphologies obtained when commercial fragrance oils were encapsulated.
Formatted abstract
The solvent evaporation method for producing microcapsules relies upon the correct wetting conditions between the three phases involved in the synthesis to allow core-shell morphologies to form. By measuring the interfacial tensions between the oil, polymer and aqueous phases, spreading coefficients can be calculated, allowing the capsule morphology to be predicted. In this work we explore the effect of surfactant chain length on capsule morphology using poly(methyl methacrylate) as the polymer and hexadecane as the core. We compared the predicted morphologies obtained using the polymer as a solid, and the polymer dissolved in dichloromethane to represent the point at which capsule formation begins. We found that using the polymer in its final, solid form gave predictions which were more consistent with our observations. The method was applied to successfully predict the capsule morphologies obtained when commercial fragrance oils were encapsulated.
Keyword Chemistry, Physical
Chemistry
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID EP/J500458/1
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and Information Technology Publications
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Created: Thu, 25 Aug 2016, 21:23:22 EST by Alison Tasker on behalf of School of Chemical Engineering