Magnification factors, receptive field images and point-image size in the superior colliculus of flying foxes: comparison with the primary visual cortex

Rosa M.G.P. and Schmid L.M. (1995) Magnification factors, receptive field images and point-image size in the superior colliculus of flying foxes: comparison with the primary visual cortex. Experimental Brain Research, 102 3: 551-556. doi:10.1007/BF00230660


Author Rosa M.G.P.
Schmid L.M.
Title Magnification factors, receptive field images and point-image size in the superior colliculus of flying foxes: comparison with the primary visual cortex
Journal name Experimental Brain Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0014-4819
Publication date 1995-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/BF00230660
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 102
Issue 3
Start page 551
End page 556
Total pages 6
Publisher Springer-Verlag
Subject 2800 Neuroscience
Abstract The magnification factor (MF) of the stratum griseum superficialle (SGS) of the superior colliculus (SC) was calculated based on visual receptive fields recorded from anaesthetised and paralysed flying foxes (Pteropus spp.). In areal terms, the MF at the representation of central vision was 4-6 times larger than that in the peripheral representation. This variation is less marked than that observed in the primary visual area (VI), but is roughly that expected if the retinotopic map in the SC was defined by the distribution of ganglion cells in the retina. Two measures of the functional spread of activity in the SC, the receptive field images and the point-image size, were calculated. Receptive field images are remarkably similar throughout the SC. As in VI, the point-image size in the SGS of flying foxes is 0.5-0.6 mm and varies little with eccentricity. Bilateral ablation of the visual cortex results in a reduction of the mean receptive field size of neurones in the SGS, and the point-image size is reduced by half. However, the shape of the point-image function is not affected. These results demonstrate that the spread of activity in the SC is nearly constant throughout the retinotopic map and that this is primarily a result of the direct retinal projection. Although the visual cortex has an expanded central representation in comparison with the SC, the corticotectal pathway does not exert a preferential influence on the central representation of the SC.
Keyword Bat
Corticotectal projection
Optic tectum
Receptive fields
Retinotectal projection
Retinotopic organisation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 5 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 23 Aug 2016, 16:04:09 EST by System User