Government policy strategies relating to the enhanced implementation of integrated pest management: A review

Foster J. (1995) Government policy strategies relating to the enhanced implementation of integrated pest management: A review. Australian Journal of Environmental Management, 2 4: 234-244. doi:10.1080/14486563.1995.10648334


Author Foster J.
Title Government policy strategies relating to the enhanced implementation of integrated pest management: A review
Journal name Australian Journal of Environmental Management   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1322-1698
Publication date 1995-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/14486563.1995.10648334
Volume 2
Issue 4
Start page 234
End page 244
Total pages 11
Subject 2308 Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
3305 Geography, Planning and Development
Abstract Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is viewed as an environmentally-friendly, sustainable strategy for protecting crops from insect and other pests. In 1992 the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development declared IPM the preferred pest management strategy, but IPM implementation around the world has often been slow and uneven. The premise of this article is that government intervention is a necessary (but not sufficient) condition for the speedy implementation, and sustained use, of IPM. The article reviews selected national government policy strategies, beyond simple funding of IPM research and development, which have acted to promote IPM implementation. The policy strategies investigated are mainly those in Indonesia, Sweden, the Netherlands and Denmark. While policy measures in each of these countries are seen to have resulted in increased IPM use, they have generally had much broader objectives. In Indonesia, for example, IPM was promoted primarily as part of a government-initiated rice production strategy. In Sweden, the Netherlands and Denmark, the overall policy thrust was on environmental management through pesticide reduction. Other broad policy strategies which conceivably could encompass and assist IPM implementation relate to quality assurance and sustainable agriculture. Some lessons for Australia are drawn from the overseas experience. It is suggested that, while IPM research and development receives significant funding in Australia, the need for wider IPM implementation has not yet made the political agenda and may not do so in its own right. Comprehensive government policy for enhanced IPM implementation may only occur as part of a broader policy thrust.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import - Archived
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 23 Aug 2016, 15:54:10 EST by System User