Parasite loads in parthenogenetic and sexual lizards (Heteronotia binoei): Support for the Red Queen hypothesis

Moritz C., Mccallum H., Donnellan S. and Roberts J.D. (1991) Parasite loads in parthenogenetic and sexual lizards (Heteronotia binoei): Support for the Red Queen hypothesis. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 244 1310: 145-149. doi:10.1098/rspb.1991.0063


Author Moritz C.
Mccallum H.
Donnellan S.
Roberts J.D.
Title Parasite loads in parthenogenetic and sexual lizards (Heteronotia binoei): Support for the Red Queen hypothesis
Journal name Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0962-8452
Publication date 1991-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1098/rspb.1991.0063
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 244
Issue 1310
Start page 145
End page 149
Total pages 5
Publisher Royal Society
Language eng
Subject 1100 Agricultural and Biological Sciences
1101 Medical Biochemistry and Metabolomics
1900 Earth and Planetary Sciences
2300 Environmental Science
Abstract One version of the Red Queen hypothesis suggests that sexual reproduction is maintained in populations because of the need to continually create genotypes that confer resistance against rapidly evolving pathogens and parasites. Here, we report that parthenogenetic individuals of the Heteronotia binoei species complex are much more prone to infection by mites than are their sexual relatives. This accords with a central prediction of the Red Queen hypothesis. The greater susceptibility of the parthenogens is consistent across localities with different combinations of parthenogenetic genotypes and sexual chromosome races and occurs despite the unusually high genetic diversity of the parthenogenetic form. These observations support the contention that clonal reproduction increases the susceptibility of hosts to infection by parasites.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import - Archived
 
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